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The Delaware River Waterfront and Philadelphia Maritime Museums

The Delaware River Valley is the metropolitan area centered on the city of Philadelphia, the region’s major commercial, cultural, and industrial center. The region’s excellent road and rail network make it the perfect location for a vacation or business trip to the Middle Atlantic States. Philadelphia International is a major airline hub with daily connections to North American destinations and from major European cities.

Phila ViewThe River and the Environment

The Delaware River is comprised of 36 tributaries and flows 330 miles from New York to Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Delaware to the Atlantic Ocean. It extends from the Catskill and Pocono mountain springs and streams flowing down to the Delaware Water Gap where steep slopes give way to gently rolling hills and sweeping valleys. Then, it stretches 134 miles from the Trenton falls to the mouth of the Delaware Bay.   

Blackbeard and the Golden Age of PiracyDelaware County and River Towns Marcus Hook’s historical significance comes from its identity as a maritime town. Originally a Lenape settlement, it became a New Sweden trading post in the 1640s with shipbuilding and fishing as early industries. The Hook was also a haven for pirates in the early 18th century and its market provided a place to sell plundered goods and re-supply for their next voyage.

The Story of Mobility in America

Maritime Museums in Historic Towns

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The Philadelphia Ship Preservation Guild maintains and sails historic ships to bring the past to the present. A non-profit organization that teaches and practices seamanship, traditional restoration, maritime culture, and sailing skills in a fun and team focused setting.

crtsy-drwc-spruce-street-harbor-park-aerial-popped-550VPThe Independence Seaport Museum features the Schooner Diligence, designed and built by Joshua and Samuel Humphreys in Philadelphia in 1797 for the Revenue-Marine and later transferred to the Navy. Schooners like Diligence played a vital role in the development of the early Navy in defending American merchant ships from attacks by Britain, France and the Barbary pirates.

The original Diligence served in the West Indies Squadron under John Barry, who commanded the Frigate United States during the Quasi War with France in 1798-1800.

The Cruiser Olympia was launched in 1892 and is the oldest steel warship afloat in the world. It has some the first modern luxuries aboard warships, including refrigeration, a fresh water distiller, steam radiators for heat, electric lighting, and a blower-operated ventilation system. Olympia required a new breed of sailor specifically trained in steam-driven and electrically-powered technology.

Washington PierPier 68 is a place to relax and enjoy the Philadelphia waterfront where you can learn about the tidal ecology of the Delaware River, its watershed, or engage in recreational fishing. Design elements include:

An Entrance Deck with whimsical painted poles and repurposed maritime bollards to create a distinctive gateway for the pier. Located just off the future trail extension, this space serves as a resting spot for those using the trail and as a place where shopping center visitors can quickly experience the Pier Park.

ferry-and-bridgeCruise the Delaware River north or south from Philadelphia and make your way to Chesapeake Bay by way of the C&D Canal or take the Ferry to Camden to visit local attractions like the battleship New Jersey.

Connect for Travel to the Delaware River Waterfront and Philadelphia Maritime Museums

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