accountability · Build Operate Transfer · Business · Circular Economy · Commerce · destination management · Energy Savings Plan · entrepreneurs · Historic District · Historic Towns · intercity transit · Logistics · Mobility · Partnerships · pay-per-use · Resilience · responsibility · shared economy · Tradition · travel plan

Collaborations and Partnerships in the Pay-per-Use Economy

Consumers, Manufacturers and Businesses in the Servitization Economy

Consumers increasingly prefer usership to ownership by utilizing pay-per-use and other on-demand services, as scalable and resilient value-driven outcomes such as pay-per-mile become available.

The Traditional make, use and dispose economy is supplanted by a circular one in which resources have a longer useful life, with product and materials recovery at the end of service life. End to end providers will be replaced by multiple product and service offerors with unique expertise in the provision of customer-centric rather than asset-centric services.

Small Businesses, especially those with clients located in rural and smaller urban communities, can increase their capabilities with environmentally viable offerings by entering into collaborations and partnerships in a multi-sector ecosystem as new companies enter the marketplace to target these opportunities via data democratization and new organizational models.

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Communities that rely on connections and collaborations within and among regions will have access to technologies to transition from a sale to a service culture that features pay-per-use and pay-by-outcome models such as pay-per-mile and power-by-the-hour, creating locally owned enterprises and achieving economies of scale pricing in areas ranging from travel service and destination management, to local and intercity mobility programs connecting large cities with micropolitan areas, and innovative energy savings, water conservation and building automation systems solutions for buildings typically found on main street and in historic districts. Technology tasks include data sources integration, micro payments, flexible billing and cost-effective self-service customer and partner interfaces.

Linking Manufacturing and Services

Circular and Shared Economies create new value as pay per use models and outcome payments change the points of reference of projects and transactions as manufacturers repair and upgrade their products with modular designs; asset management and optimum maintenance become major capabilities. Equipment re-use, remanufacturing and redeployment as well as asset harvesting allow manufacturers to offer life cycle management services.

a collaborative system that delivers seamless customer experiences

Build Operate Transfer · Business · Cogeneration · Conservation · destination management · Efficiency · Energy Savings Plan · entrepreneurs · Historic District · Historic Towns · renewable energy · Resilience · Sustainable Communities · water quality

Energy and Water Project Funding

Small and Medium-sized Commercial Buildings account for 95 percent of building stock and consume half the energy in a sector of the economy responsible for 20 percent of the total energy consumption. Owners of smaller buildings are often unaware of the amount of energy wasted and the opportunity for savings that building automation systems provide. This sector hasn’t BAS for the following reasons: the high cost of tailoring software and acquiring hardware components is beyond the reach of most small- and medium-sized properties; the owner is not always the tenant that pays the utility bill, hence limited incentive to invest in the building’s energy efficiency.

Building Leases spell out how energy costs are divided between tenants and owners. Often, these leases are not structured in a way that promotes energy savings. Tenants have no incentive to save energy in their leased premises because energy costs are based on tenant square footage. Building owners have no incentive to invest in energy efficiency because the operating expenses are passed onto tenants. 

Green Leases promote energy efficiency by creating lease structures which equitably align the costs and benefits of efficiency investments between building owners and tenants.

Energy Management Systems can be used to centrally control devices like HVAC units and lighting systems across multiple locations. EMS also provide metering, sub-metering and monitoring functions that allow facility managers to gather data and insight to make more informed decisions about energy activities across their sites.

Distributed Generation occurs on a property site when energy is sold to the building occupants; here, commercial PPAs enable businesses and governments to purchase electricity directly from the generator rather than from the utility. Power Purchase Agreements PPA is a legal contract between an electricity generator and a power purchaser.

Financing Energy Efficiency Projects face several financial impediments, including information. Financial institutions often lack a full understanding of energy efficiency technologies which are almost always investments with long repayment terms. Small towns and rural communities require specific and unique knowledge, expertise and funding sources.

A Power Purchase Agreement PPA is a legal contract between an electricity generator and a power purchaser. Contractual terms may last anywhere between 5 and 20 years, during which time the power purchaser buys energy, and sometimes also capacity and services, from the electricity generator. Such agreements play a key role in the financing of independently owned electricity generating assets. The seller is typically an independent power producer – IPP.

PPAs Facilitate the Financing of Distributed Generation Assets

Distributed Generation occurs on a property site with energy is sold to the building occupants; here, commercial PPAs enable businesses and governments to purchase electricity directly from the generator rather than from the utility. The parties involved include: The Seller is the entity that owns the project. In most cases, the seller is organized as a special purpose entity whose main purpose is to facilitate project financing, and The Buyer is typically a utility or building occupants under the distributed generation scenario.

Water Resources Strategies on Main Street and Historic Districts

Urban Flooding many small towns across the country lose drinking water because of aging pipes, in addition, asphalt and concrete prevent rainwater from soaking into the ground. The solution to inadequate storm water and drinking water management: green infrastructure like rain gardens and bios wales.

Aging Pipes and Outdated Systems Waste 14 percent of Daily Water Consumption

Water Losses from aging infrastructure and faulty metering lead to lost revenue for utilities and higher rates for water users. Also, increasing demand, maintenance and energy costs are responsible for a 90% increase in utility rates. This trend can be countered by best management practices BMP that include state-of-the-art audits, leak detection monitoring, targeted repairs and upgrades, pressure management, and better metering technologies. 

Integrated Water Systems in Small Towns and Rural Communities by 2030 the world will need to produce 50 percent more for food and energy and 30 percent more fresh water. Solar pumps are reliable technology which can compete with conventional pumping technologies such as diesel pumping. Large amounts of energy are used in the entire water cycle. Water Pumps play a major role in all water and waste-water processes.

Tell us about Your Energy and Water Plans

Business · Cultural Heritage · cultural itineraries · destination management · entrepreneurs · Friends and Family Travel · Historic District · Historic Towns · intercity transit · Lakes · Maritime Heritage · museums · ships · Tradition · travel plan

Destination Vermont

Agriculture Industry Heritage Museums Small Towns and Downtowns

Agriculture and Food Heritage experience Vermont’s thriving food and arts scene, local cuisine from artisan chefs, creative food companies, and passionate farmers thriving alongside artists sharing their arts and crafts.

Museums tell the story of Vermont’s heritage, arts and crafts. Early Vermonters were hardworking and industrious; museums of agriculture and industry tell the stories of how natural resources were employed to help provide for families and build Vermont: the American Precision Museum in Windsor, the Billings Farm in Woodstock, the New England Maple in Pittsford, the Vermont Granite in Barre and the Vermont Marble Museum in Proctor.

Learn the Stories of Shipwrecks at the Lake Champlain Maritime Museum in Vergennes

Downtowns and Small Towns Vermont’s thriving downtowns are where visitors and residents find the distinctive local businesses, historic buildings, and rich cultural and social activities that form Vermont’s special sense of community. These authentic and attractive downtowns and villages are recognized as a key part of the state’s allure.

Vermont Downtowns are a Centerpiece of Community Life

The Downtown Program, established in 1994, is a revitalization effort that builds on each community’s history; these local efforts have demonstrated how revitalization encourages the local economy and cultural institutions, while supporting growth in a way that minimizes environmental impacts.

Waterbury is a vibrant community in the Green Mountains, encompassing Waterbury Village, Colbyville and Waterbury Center.  A 20-minute drive from Montpelier, 30 minutes from Burlington, and midway between the resort areas of Stowe and the Mad River Valley, Waterbury sits at the intersection of three of Vermont’s most heavily traveled and scenic roads. Downtown is home to a colorful mix of residential neighborhoods, civic and cultural facilities, independent small businesses and the Ben & Jerry Factory. 

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Newport lies on the southern shore of Lake Memphremagog just a few miles south of the Quebec border. Visitors can pursue year-round outdoor adventures, including boating, swimming, hiking, biking, fishing, skiing, and snowmobiling.

Newport eateries source local foods and turn them into award winning dishes

Burlington and its walkable waterfront are home to a thriving arts scene, creative entrepreneurship, great shopping, three colleges and a university, and a full range of four-season outdoor pursuits. Fountains, a brick-paved pedestrian mall, and historic buildings ranging in style from Victorian to Art Deco and Streamline Modern provide the backdrop for the Church Street Marketplace. The nearby waterfront includes lakeside parks, ferry crossings, excursion boats, and a 12.5-mile walk and bike path that connects to the Lake Champlain Islands and its 200 miles of shorelines.

one of the best 100 small arts towns in America

Montpelier is the largest urban historic district in Vermont. Of the exquisite historic buildings, the crown jewel is the impeccably restored State House, one of the oldest and best preserved in the country. Three blocks away is the city’s bustling business district where independently owned shops offering books, recordings, clothing, fine crafts and pastries.  

 Your Destination Vermont Travel Plan

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Fort Worth Texas Cowboys Cowgirls and Culture

Cultural Heritage Museums Water Resources and the Environment Local Food Wine and Beer Public Transport Initiatives

Originally settled in 1849 as an army outpost along the Trinity River, Fort Worth was one of eight forts assigned to protect settlers on the advancing frontier. The cattle industry was king for a generation of people working the Fort Worth leg of the historic Chisholm Trail, which ran from the 1860s to the 1870s when the Texas & Pacific Railway arrived. In the years that followed, oil and aviation brought new wealth throughout the region.

The post-war years found Fort Worth capitalizing on its strengths as a transport, business and military center. Cultural pursuits included the development of the city’s internationally acclaimed museum district. The mid-1980s saw the start of a major revitalization of that city’s downtown and the introduction of Sundance Square, a 35-block commercial, residential, entertainment and retail district. Fort Worth’s red brick buildings and its Western heritage live on as visitors can experience the Old West beautifully preserved through the Stockyards National Historic District.

Food Brews and Spirits experience cowboy cuisine, trendy farm-to-table, authentic Mexican and bayou fare. Highlights include beef briskets, pork ribs and locally grown, organic artisan cheeses, alongside nicely paired wines. Artisanal distilleries offer straight bourbon, premium blended whiskey and vodka made from black-eyed peas. Also handcrafted beers, some brewed with milk, honey and sugar, accompanied by live music and local food trucks.

The Outdoors the Trinity Trails extend through Fort Worth for over 40 miles along the Trinity River with amenities for hikers, bikers, runners, and horseback riders with connections to the Stockyards, Downtown, the Zoo and the Cultural District. The Fort Worth Nature Center and Refuge is a 3621-acre preserved natural area designated by the Department of the Interior as a National Natural Landmark Site in 1980. Established in 1964 as the Greer Island Nature Center, it has small, genetically pure bison herd, a resident prairie dog town, and the prairie upon which they live. It is one of the largest urban parks of its type in the United States.

Museums renowned for their architecture and the quality of their collections, the Cultural District is home to six museums; Fort Worth is also home to museums devoted to Western heritage and the city’s colorful past. 

The National Cowgirl Museum and Hall of Fame is dedicated to honoring trailblazing women of the American West. Its multimedia exhibits and historic photographs, papers, clothing, spurs and saddles tell the stories of women pioneers, ranchers, performers and rodeo stars.

Log Cabin Village 19th century Texas nestled on three acres and nine historic structures, Texas history is portrayed through authentic log homes, a blacksmith shop, a one-room schoolhouse, smokehouse, water-powered gristmill and herb garden. Experience frontier chores, including candle making, spinning and weaving.

The Modern Art Museum maintains one of the foremost collections of international modern and contemporary art in the United States with works by Andy Warhol, Jackson Pollock, and Mark Rothko are displayed in a concrete and glass building surrounded by a reflecting pond.

The Kimbell Art Museum is a permanent collection with major works by Fra Angelico, Velazquez, Bernini, Rembrandt, Goya, Monet, Cezanne, Picasso, Mondrian and Matisse. It is also home to Michelangelo’s first known painting. The collection comprises Asian and non-Western as well as European art as well as traveling exhibits on display throughout the year.

The American Airlines Museum is dedicated to commercial aviation and the world of flight. Exhibits include hundreds of historical artifacts, photographs, full-scale aircraft engines and a rare Douglas DC-3 airliner.

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Transportation it is easy to get around Fort Worth or travel to nearby and Dallas and Grapevine. 

Bus the T – Fort Worth Transport Authority – provides extensive service throughout the city and its cultural attractions.

Rail the TRE – Trinity Rail Express – connects Fort Worth and Dallas with transfer access to DFW International Airport.

Air DFW is only 17.5 miles from downtown Fort Worth via bus, rail or taxi service. From here, you can reach any major city in the U.S. in less than four hours.

Walking is a wonderful way to experience the city’ entertainment districts and the Trinity Trails.

Bike Sharing: Bike sharing is an inexpensive, healthy and environmentally friendly way to get around Fort Worth. Pick up a bike at any of the 40 docking stations.

Plan Your Fort Worth and Texas Business Trip or Vacation

Business · canals · destination management · food and wine itineraries · Historic Towns · intercity transit · Italy · Lakes · museums · Travel · travel plan

Milan Italy

Art Architecture Cuisine Design Fashion and Shopping

Milan is located between the Po River, the Alps and Italian lakes region. The concentric layout of the city center has been influenced by the Navigli, an ancient system of navigable and interconnected canals, now mostly covered. There are only few remains of the ancient Roman colony of Mediolanum. Following the edict of Milan in 313 A.D., several basilicas were built by the city gates, still standing and refurbished over the centuries. The cathedral was built between 1386 and 1577, is the fifth largest in the world and the most important example of Gothic architecture in Italy. In the 15th century, an old fortress was enlarged and embellished to become the Castello Sforzesco, the seat of an elegant Renaissance court surrounded by a walled hunting park.

Economy the Milan metro area generates approximately 9% of the national GDP and is home to more than 8 percent of all businesses in Italy, including many media and advertising agencies. Milan is a major world fashion center – 12,000 companies, 800 show rooms, and 6,000 sales outlets – and manufacturing center. Other important products made here include chemicals, machinery, pharmaceuticals and plastics. Other key sectors in the city’s economy are advanced research in health and biotechnologies, engineering, banking and finance.

Museums and Art Galleries the Brera Portrait Gallery holds one of the foremost collections of Italian paintings. The Sforza Castle hosts numerous art collections and exhibitions, especially statues, ancient arms and furniture. Leonardo Da Vinci worked here from 1482 until 1499 and was commissioned to paint the Virgin of the Rocks and the Last Supper. Milan was affected by the Baroque in the 17th and 18th centuries, hosting numerous artists, architects and painters of that period, such as Caravaggio. In the 20th century, the city was the epicenter of the Futurist artistic movement. The Museo del Novecento is a 20th Century art gallery with sections dedicated to Futurism, Spatialism and Poor Art.

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Music Milan is a major national and international center of the performing arts, most notably opera. La Scala is considered one of the most prestigious opera houses in the world, hosting the premieres of numerous operas since the mid19th century. Other major theatres in Milan include the Arcimboldi and the Lirico.The city also has a renowned symphony orchestra, conservatory and is a major center for musical composition.

Fashion and Shopping a global capital in industrial design, fashion and architecture, Milan is the commercial capital of Italy and one of Europe’s most dynamic cities, it accounts for the lion’s share of the fashion trade, with some of the most renowned fashion houses headquartered here. Its upscale fashion district and Galleria, the world’s first shopping mall, offer the best shopping opportunities. 

Architecture and Design the city’s modern skyscrapers and unique liberty style office and apartment buildings make it a trend setter in architecture. Milan is also a leader in high-quality furniture and interior design and is home to Europe’s largest permanent trade exhibition – Fiera Milano – and one of the most prestigious international furniture and design fairs. Milan has recently undergone a massive urban renewal with several famous architects taking part in projects such as EXPO 2015.

Food and Wine home to a proud culinary tradition, Milan specialties include classic dishes like cotoletta alla milanese, cassoeula, stewed pork rib chops and sausage with cabbage, ossobuco, risotto, busecca and brasato, salami and gorgonzola cheese. Sweets include chiacchiere, panettone and tortelli. World-renowned restaurants and cafés can be found in the historic center, Brera and Navigli districts.

Business and Vacation Travel to Milan and Italy

Build Operate Transfer · Business · Commerce · Conservation · destination management · Efficiency · Geography · Historic Towns · intercity transit · microtransit · Mobility · Travel

Build Operate and Transfer Projects

Travel Mobility Services Energy Efficiency and Water Conservation

The Concept a program anchored in communities with a history as hub cities, hence a reliance on connections and collaborations within and among regions, resulting in a national trading platform with economies of scale utilizing historic trade routes and state of the art products and services to the benefit of community commuters, residents and visitors.

The Objective achieve economies of scale pricing in selected communities around the US in the areas of travel, destination management, transit, 5G, energy efficiency and water conservation.

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Ways and Means a build operate and transfer project, unique to each community but connecting participating towns via customer sharing, transit programs, energy management and similar measures.

Participants a team of product and services providers who provide know-how and resources to jump-start projects in collaboration with local partners.

The BOT is established for a set duration – 18 to 24 months, renewable – with transfer to local partners, inclusive of training for local individuals, existing businesses, local government and nonprofits, where applicable.

Client Targets: US and International Vacationers, Business Travelers and Commuters

Connecting air and rail metro hubs with micropolitan communities via

Intercity Multimodal and Local Micro Transit hub and spoke services to

Leverage travel client relationships and engage local product and service providers in:

travel related value-added services    transportation   

 energy efficiency    water conservation

Creating Virtual Hotels and improving Customer Service.

A Team Tasked with Developing Deploying Managing and Marketing Systems and Tools that Benefit Your Community

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Wichita Kansas

a trading post and industrial hub a regional center of culture media and trade

downtown wichitaWichita lies on the Arkansas River in south-central Kansas, 157 mi (253 km) north of Oklahoma City, 181 mi (291 km) southwest of Kansas City, and 439 mi (707 km) east-southeast of Denver. The Arkansas follows a winding course, south-southeast through Wichita, roughly bisecting the city.

A Trading Post on the Chisholm Trail in the 1860s, it became a destination for cattle drives traveling north from Texas to Kansas railroads, earning it the nickname Cowtown.

the exploration place wichitaBusiness opportunities attracted area hunters and traders, and a new settlement was organized as the Wichita Town Company, naming the settlement after the Wichita tribe. In the early 20th century, oil and natural gas deposits were discovered nearby triggering an economic boom in Wichita as producers established refineries, fueling stations, and headquarters in the city. Resources generated by the oil boom enabled local entrepreneurs to invest in airplane manufacturing. Except for a slow period in the 1970s, Wichita has continued to grow steadily into the 21st century as the city government and local organizations began collaborating to re-develop downtown Wichita and older neighborhoods in the city.

wichita former train stationNeighborhoods include Old Town, a 50-acre area home to nightclubs, bars, restaurants, a movie theater, shops, apartments and condominiums, many of which make use of historical warehouse-type spaces. The two most notable residential areas of Wichita are Riverside and College Hill, along with Delano on the west side of the Arkansas River and Midtown in the north-central part of the city.

wichita orpheum theaterThe Arts Wichita is a cultural center for Kansas and home to several art museums and performing arts groups. The Wichita Art Museum is the largest art museum in the state of Kansas with 7,000 works in permanent collections and the Ulrich Museum of Art at Wichita State University is a modern and contemporary art museum with over 6,300 works. Small art galleries are scattered around the city with some clustered in the districts of Old Town, Delano and south Commerce street. The music hub of central Kansas draws major acts from around the world, performing at concert halls, arenas and stadiums around the area.

Wichita Transit operates 53 buses on 18 fixed bus routes within the city providing over 2 million trips per year as well as a demand response paratransit service with 320,800 passenger trips annually. Intercity bus services connect Wichita with other Kansas towns, Oklahoma and Colorado. Wichita’s Bikeways cover 115 miles of which one third were added between 201 and 2018

the keeper of the plains wichita, kansasConnect for Travel to Wichita and Kansas

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