Conservation · Efficiency · Lakes · Rivers · Sustainable Communities · water quality · waterways

Water Supply Planning

Water Consumption comes from a lake, reservoir, river or a groundwater aquifer via wells. Individually, we consume 80 to 100 gallons per day and the typical household 400/day. A Community Growth Management Plan determines the quantity of water that can be safely withdrawn from all sources under drought conditions; the available supply must then be compared with current demand as well as that with anticipated growth. If demand comes too close to supply, then the plan must recommend actions to offset a shortage.

Excessive Withdrawal Prevention is established with safe and/or sustainable yields of an aquifer’s water balance analysis. First, you calculate the amount of precipitation replenishing the water source during drought periods. Precipitation supplies are then subtracted from freshwater flowing into wetlands, streams and waterways that keep these aquatic resources healthy. Thereafter, all uses are accounted for: irrigation, industrial processing, cooling, hydroelectric and other.  The balance is the amount of water that can be safely and sustainably withdrawn. 

Water Consumption Growth is Limited to the Remaining Amount

Climate Change may have a substantial effect on future water supplies; studies indicate that the combined effect of decline in precipitation, and increased temperatures, may cause a 35 percent reduction in the amount of water entering rivers by the year 2040. 

FAQs does your growth management plan include:

criteria for assessing water supply adequacy

current drought-period water supply and demand

how water supply and demand will change with anticipated growth

actions for resolving water supply deficiencies and the factual basis for the effectiveness of each action

how shortfalls will be resolved with anticipated growth.

A New Plan for Your Area if your current plan is about to expire or rates poorly based on the Quality of Life Growth Management system, we can assist you in carrying out the outlined steps and/or conduct a community workshop and assist you in formulating a planning strategy for your community.

Tell us about Your Water Supply Plan

Build Operate Transfer · CHP · Cogeneration · Conservation · Efficiency · electric grid · Energy Savings Plan · Net Metering · renewable energy · Resilience

Micro-CHP

Solar Cogeneration and Net Metering Systems

A cogeneration plant often referred to as a combined heat and power plant is tasked with producing electricity and thermal energy in the form of heat or steam, or useful mechanical work, such as shaft power, from the same fuel source.

Micro-CHP engine systems are currently based on several different technologies: Internal combustion engines, Stirling engines, Fuel cell, Microturbines, Steam engine/Steam motor using either water or organic chemicals such as refrigerants.

Micro combined heat and power or mCHP applies to single or multi-family homes or small office buildings in the range of up to 50 kW. Local generation has the potential for a higher efficiency than traditional grid-level generators since it lacks the 8-10% energy losses from transporting electricity over long distances as well as 10–15% energy losses from heat transfer in district heating networks due to the difference between the thermal energy carrier – hot water – and the colder external environment.

Most Systems use natural gas as the primary energy source and emit carbon dioxide. A micro-CHP system usually contains a small fuel cell or a heat engine as a prime mover used to rotate a generator which provides electric power, while simultaneously utilizing the waste heat from the prime mover for a building’s heating, ventilation, and air conditioning. A micro-CHP generator delivers electricity as the by-product or may generate electricity with heat as the by-product. 

Micro-CHP systems have been facilitated by recent technological developments of small heat engines

Type 2008 2012 2015 2020
Electrical efficiency at rated power 34% 40% 42.5% 45%
CHP energy efficiency 80% 85% 87.5% 90%
Factory cost $750/kW $650/kW $550/kW $450/kW
Transient response (10%–90% rated power) 5 min 4 min 3 min 2 min
Start-up time from 20 °C ambient temperature 60 min 45 min 30 min 20 min
Degradation with cycling < 2%/1000 h 0.7%/1000 h 0.5%/1000 h 0.3%/1000 h
Operating lifetime 6,000 h 30,000 h 40,000 h 60,000 h
System availability 97% 97.5% 98% 99%

CPVT Concentrated photovoltaics and thermal also called CHAPS combined heat and power solar, is a cogeneration technology used in concentrated photovoltaics that produce electricity and heat in the same module. The heat may be employed in district and water heating, air conditioning, process heat or desalination.

Net metering micro-CHP systems achieve much of their savings by the value of electrical energy which is replaced by auto produced electricity. A generate-and-resell model supports this as home-generated power exceeding the in-home needs is sold back to the electrical utility. This system is efficient because the energy used is distributed and used instantaneously over the electric grid.

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Build Operate Transfer · Business · Commerce · Conservation · destination management · Efficiency · Geography · Historic Towns · intercity transit · microtransit · Mobility · Travel

Build Operate and Transfer Projects

Travel Mobility Services Energy Efficiency and Water Conservation

The Concept a program anchored in communities with a history as hub cities, hence a reliance on connections and collaborations within and among regions, resulting in a national trading platform with economies of scale utilizing historic trade routes and state of the art products and services to the benefit of community commuters, residents and visitors.

The Objective achieve economies of scale pricing in selected communities around the US in the areas of travel, destination management, transit, 5G, energy efficiency and water conservation.

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Travel Plans     Intercity & Local Transport

Ways and Means a build operate and transfer project, unique to each community but connecting participating towns via customer sharing, transit programs, energy management and similar measures.

Participants a team of product and services providers who provide know-how and resources to jump-start projects in collaboration with local partners.

The BOT is established for a set duration – 18 to 24 months, renewable – with transfer to local partners, inclusive of training for local individuals, existing businesses, local government and nonprofits, where applicable.

Client Targets: US and International Vacationers, Business Travelers and Commuters

Connecting air and rail metro hubs with micropolitan communities via

Intercity Multimodal and Local Micro Transit hub and spoke services to

Leverage travel client relationships and engage local product and service providers in:

travel related value-added services    transportation   

 energy efficiency    water conservation

Creating Virtual Hotels and improving Customer Service.

A Team Tasked with Developing Deploying Managing and Marketing Systems and Tools that Benefit Your Community

Commerce · Efficiency · hub and spoke transport · intercity transit · Last Mile · Logistics · mobility network · optic fiber · Performance

Telecom and Energy Networks First and Last Miles

The last mile or last kilometer is a term widely used in the telecommunication, energy and transportation industries to deliver services to retail customers; specifically, it refers to the portion of the network chain that physically reaches the end-user’s premises. The word mile is a metaphor because the last mile of a network to the user is conversely the first mile from the user’s premises to the outside world when the user is sending data or initiating a transport service.

The Speed Bottleneck in networks occurs in the last/first mile; bandwidth effectively limits the data that can be delivered to the customer because networks have relatively few high capacity trunk channels branching out to feed many final mile clients. The final mile links, being the most numerous and thus most expensive part of the system, as well as having to interface with a wide variety of user equipment, are the most difficult to upgrade to new technology. Phone trunk lines that carry calls between switching centers are made of optical-fiber but the last mile is a technology which has remained unchanged for over a century since the original laying of copper phone cables.

The term last mile has expanded outside the communications industries to include other distribution networks that deliver goods to customers, such as the pipes that deliver water and natural gas and the final legs of mail and package deliveries. The problem of sending any given amount of information across a channel can therefore be viewed in terms of sending Information-Carrying Energy ICE. For this reason, the concept of a pipe or conduit is relevant for examining existing systems.

conduits that carry small amounts of a resource a short distance to physically separated endpoints

Cost and Efficiency the high-capacity conduits in these systems tend to also have in common the ability to efficiently transfer a resource over a long distance. Only a small fraction of the resource being transferred is wasted or misdirected. The same cannot be said of lower-capacity conduits; this has to do with efficiency of scale. Conduits that are located closer to the end-user, do not have as many users supporting them; resources supporting these smaller conduits come from the local area. Resources for these conduits can be optimized to achieve the best solutions, however, lower operating efficiencies and greater installation expenses can cause these smaller conduits to be the most expensive and difficult part of a distribution system.

economies of scale increases of a conduit’s capacity are less expensive as the capacity increases

The economics of information transfer an effective last-mile conduit must:

Deliver signal power, must have adequate signal power capacity;

Experience low occurrence of conversion to unusable energy forms;

Support wide transmission bandwidth;

Deliver high signal-to-noise ratio, low unwanted-signal power;

Provide nomadic connectivity.

In addition, a good solution to the last-mile problem must provide each user high availability, reliability, low latency and high per-user capacity. A conduit which is shared among multiple end-users should provide a correspondingly higher capacity in order to properly support each individual user for information transfer in each direction.

Optical fiber offers high information capacity and is the medium of choice for scalability given the increasing bandwidth requirements of modern applications. Unlike copper-based and wireless last-mile mediums, it has built-in future capacity through upgrades of end-point optics and electronics without having to change the existing fiber infrastructure. 

optical fiber is the future of local and regional commerce

Efficiency · hub and spoke transport · intercity transit · Last Mile · Logistics · microtransit · Mobility · mobility network · public transit · Transit Calculator · Travel Plan Fees

Congestion Pricing in Transport

a pricing strategy that regulates demand without increasing the supply

Congestion pricing entails surcharging users in excess demand situations for public transport, electricity, data and communications and road pricing to reduce traffic congestion. The policy objective is to leverage cost to make users sensitive when consuming during peak demand and pay for additional congestion, encouraging demand redistribution.

Implementation have reduced congestion in urban environments; however, critics point out that the system is not equitable even as many economists believe in the effectiveness of road pricing in some form. Four types are in use:

a cordon around downtown areas;

area wide congestion pricing;

city center toll ring, and

congestion pricing, where access to a location is priced.

Economic rationale at zero cost, demand exceeds supply, causing shortages corrected with equilibrium prices instead of increasing supply; this entails price increases when and where congestion occurs.

congestion pricing is one demand side efficiency strategy

A quantity supplied is less than the quantity demanded at what is essentially a price of zero. If a service is provided free of charge, people tend to demand more and waste it instead of paying the price that reflected its cost. Congestion pricing charges help allocate resources to their most valuable uses.

Road congestion pricing is found almost exclusively in urban areas and city centers whereas cordon area pricing is a fee paid by users to enter a restricted area. Its effectiveness has improved with technological advances in toll collection.

Cities that have implemented congestion pricing schemes show traffic volume reductions from 10% to 30% as well as reduced air pollution. In some locations, net earnings are invested to promote mobility management, reduce air pollution, initiate pedestrian and cycling strategies as well as upgrade public transportation.

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Travel Plans     Intercity & Local Transport

Cultural Heritage · cultural itineraries · destination management · Efficiency · food and wine itineraries · Historic Towns · intercity transit · Mobility · museums · Sustainable Communities · Tradition · Transit Calculator · travel plan

Philadelphia History Traditions and Sustainability

Your visit to the US Mid-Atlantic Region begins where America began, with a two-night three day stay.

Where History is Still Being Made among the many sights to take in when visiting the first capital of the United States: The Liberty Bell Center which houses the American Revolution’s defining symbol, the site of the meetings of Congress and the Constitutional Convention at the City Tavern in the Old City as well as Carpenters Hall. In Declaration House, visitors can see where Thomas Jefferson drafted the Declaration of Independence and Independence Hall where it was eventually signed.

laurel hill mansionPlaces to Visit a culturally rich and diverse city, Philadelphia is home to museums covering everything from natural sciences to African American history, science, archaeology and anthropology. Children will enjoy a day at the “Please Touch” Museum and the “Once upon a Nation” tour. Explore Christ Church Burial Ground; dating from 1695, the cemetery is the final resting place of Benjamin Franklin. For a sightseeing tour with a difference, take a cruise on the Delaware River. The city is also home to several wonderful gardens and arboretums. Also, the Battleship New Jersey and Valley Forge National Historic Park, site of the battle of 1777/78.

The Arts in 1805 an art collector, believing Philadelphia the best place for the encouragement of artistic taste, offered the city numerous paintings, sculptures, engravings and other art work. To accept the gift the city formed the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, the oldest art school and museum in the United States. The Philadelphia Museum of Art was founded in 1876 to maintain the art exhibits from the Centennial Exposition. It holds over 225,000 pieces of artwork including work by van Gogh, Picasso, and Marcel Duchamp. Nearby is the Rodin Museum, founded in 1929, with the largest collection of Rodin works outside of France.

phila warterfrontPhiladelphia has more Public Art than any other American City

The inclusion of decorative art in city structures goes back to the 19th century. In 1872, the Fairmount Park Art Association became the first private association in the United States dedicated to integrating public art and urban planning. With more murals than any other U.S. city, the Mural Arts Program has funded over 2,300 murals created by professional, staff and volunteer artists.

Culture Philadelphia’s history goes back to 1682 and the city’s founding by William Penn. Originally inhabited by the Lenape, Philadelphia was envisioned as a place where people could live without fear of persecution because of their religion; hence, many came to find refuge here. As Philadelphia grew into a major political and economic center, many religious and ethnic groups have contributed to the arts, music, television, architecture and food.
Fairs & Events the Mummers Parade’s first modern version was held in 1901 on New Year’s Day. Since 1993 every summer around the 4th of July, the multi-day Welcome America event celebrates Philadelphia as the nation’s birthplace. Three major annual shows in Philadelphia are the Flower Show, the Philadelphia International Auto Show and the Philadelphia Antiques Show. Festivals include the Folk Festival and Unity Day an event celebrating unity between people and families. Pride Fest events promote gay and lesbian rights. In September, the 16-day Philadelphia Live Arts Festival and Philly Fringe feature experimental art, performances and exhibits.

old original levis hot dogsFood the city’s culinary tradition was shaped by several ethnic groups. Cheese stake and soft pretzels are well known icons of the city. The 1970s saw a restaurant renaissance that is continuing into the 21st century. Other Philadelphia food traditions include:

The hoagie a sandwich made of meat and cheese with lettuce, tomatoes, and onions

Pepper Pot, a soup of tripe, meat and vegetables dating from the Revolutionary War era

Snapper Soup a thick brown turtle soup served with sherry.

Markets towards the end of the 19th century the large number of Italian immigrants in South Philadelphia led to the creation of the Italian Market on 9th Street with numerous types of food vendors along with other shops. The Reading Terminal Market is popular with visitors.

Music the city is home to a vibrant and well-documented musical heritage, stretching back to colonial times. Innovations in classical, opera, R&B, jazz and soul have earned Philadelphia national and international renown. A diverse population has also given it a reputation for styles ranging from dancehall to Irish traditional music, as well as classical and folk music. The city has played an equally prominent role in developing popular music. In the early years of rock and roll, several South Philadelphia-born popular vocalists made Philadelphia and popular music virtually synonymous. This led to the airing of the popular rock and roll dance show American Bandstand, from Philadelphia in front of a national audience.

Performing-Arts the city’s most senior venue is the famed Academy of Music. Established in 1857, it is the longest continuously operating opera house in the United States and is home to many internationally recognized performance ensembles. The Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts, home of the internationally renowned Philadelphia Orchestra, opened in 2001. In addition, the Tower Theatre just outside of Philadelphia serves as a destination for many top touring acts.

Philadelphia SkylineSustainability In the city of Philadelphia, the waterfront is now a 6-mile walking and biking destination. Trail features include streetscape improvements along the entire waterfront trail, a bi-directional bikeway, pedestrian walkway and rain gardens that collect the first inch of storm water, relieving the city sewer system during major weather events, as well as benches, bike racks, decorative street pavers and innovative solar trail lighting. Center City offers a thriving culture and entertainment scene as well as contemporary arts museum with training programs and study tours for students, aspiring artists and family traveling.

US Mid-Atlantic Travel  an eight-day program for Families Schools and Groups

Philadelphia, Hershey, Harrisburg, Washington DC, Maryland Brandywine Valley

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Conservation · Cultural Heritage · cultural itineraries · destination management · Efficiency · Historic Towns · renewable energy · Rivers · Sustainable Communities · travel plan · water quality · waterways

Georgetown Texas

victorian architecture economic development energy and the environment

georgetown downtownGeorgetown is located 30 miles from Austin on the northeastern edge of Texas Hill Country. Portions of the town are located on either side of the Balcones Escarpment, a fault line characterized by black, fertile soils of the Black land Prairie, with the west side consisting of hilly, limestone karst formations.

The North and Middle Forks of the San Gabriel River run through the city, providing over 30 miles of hike and bike trails, parks and recreation for residents and visitors.

Blue Hole park in Georgetown Texas (view 4)History the earliest known historical occupants of the county, the Tonkawas, were a flint-working, hunting people who followed buffalo on foot and periodically set fire to the prairie to aid them in their hunts. During the 18th century, they made the transition to a horse culture and used firearms. The town was named for George Washington Glasscock who donated the land for the new community; the early American and Swedish pioneers were attracted to the area’s abundance of timber and clear water.

Victorian Architecture in 1976, a local ordinance was passed t protect the historic central business district. Georgetown has three National Register Historic Districts: Williamson County Courthouse District, Belford National District and the University Avenue/Elm Street District.

m.b. lockett building, georgetown, txSouthwestern University the Oldest University in Texas is one-half Mile from the Historic Square

Economic Development Georgetown was an agrarian community for most of the 19th and early 20th centuries. The Shawnee Trail, a cattle trail that led from Texas to the rail centers in Kansas and Missouri, crossed through Georgetown. The establishment of Southwestern University and construction of a railroad contributed to the town’s growth and importance. Cotton was the dominant crop in the area between the 1880s and the 1920s.

san gabrial villagePopulation growth and industrial expansion continued modestly in the 20th century until about 1960, when residential, commercial, and industrial development, due to major growth and urban expansion of nearby Austin, greatly accelerated. Currently, Georgetown is served by the appropriately named Georgetown Railroad, a short line railroad that connects with the Union Pacific Railroad at Round Rock and at Granger.

Energy and the Environment in March 2015, Georgetown announced that their municipal-owned utility, Georgetown Utility Systems, would buy 100% of its power for its customers from wind and solar farms, effectively making the city 100% green-powered.

lake travisConnect for Travel to Georgetown and Texas

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