Conservation · Cultural Heritage · cultural itineraries · destination management · food and wine itineraries · Historic Towns · intercity transit · museums · Rivers · Sustainable Communities · Tradition · travel plan · water quality · waterways · Wine Trails

Chester County Pennsylvania

American Historic Small-Town Itineraries

Chester County William Penn established Chester County in 1682 as one of the first three counties in Pennsylvania; West Chester is the county seat. Other historic towns in Chester County include Kennett Square, Oxford and Phoenixville. Each has its own unique agricultural, revolutionary and industrial histories. These Main Streets of the Brandywine Valley are treasures of a time gone by with lovely tree-lined streets filled with restaurants, shops, galleries, markets, festivals and more. 

West Chester nestled in the heart of the Brandywine Valley, West Chester is a picturesque and historic community that offers small-town charm with a cosmopolitan flair. Their downtown boasts 83 shops and 59 restaurants. The Chester County Historical Society is a history museum which tells the American story from a local perspective. West Chester’s Main Streets offer a host of diverse shops and galleries. Specialty shops featuring imported olive oils, fine handmade chocolates, cigars and skate and surf equipment. The West Chester railroad, one of the oldest in America, offers a 90-minute train excursion through the beautiful Chester Creek Valley.

Kennett Square the town was originally called Kennet Square, with the name “Kennet”, England, and “Square” coming from the original William Penn one square mile land grant. General Sir William Howe marched through Kennett to the Battle of Brandywine during the American Revolution. Kennett is famous for being the mushroom capital of the world; over 60 percent of the nation’s mushroom crop is from this region. This small-town main street is filled with an eco-boutique, a rare book store, quilts, antiques and a spa. A walk down Kennett’s State Street is also a culinary adventure.

Oxford on the way stop to view the historic covered bridges that surround the countryside. Then, stroll down Oxford’s Main Street where Amish buggy’s share the road, a vibrant art alliance hosts exhibits, shows and events, farmers markets offer local foods and wares, and charming coffee and tea shops.

Reduce Transit Times and Travel Cost on Your Next Trip

Travel Plans     Intercity & Local Transport

Phoenixville like many American towns and cities, Phoenixville owes its growth to its waterways. The Phoenix Company Foundry, built in 1882, is home to the Schuylkill River Heritage Center, a historic gateway to northern Chester County that provides information about places of interest to visit throughout the region. Originally called Manavon, Phoenixville was settled in 1732. In its industrial heyday early in the twentieth century, it was an important manufacturing center and it was the site of great iron and steel mills, boiler works, silk mill, underwear and hosiery factories, a match factory, and Etruscan majolica pottery. The Iron Hill Brewery is a great gathering spot on Bridge Street, Phoenixville’s main drag; it specializes in handcrafted beer and creative cuisine. Charming shops line the main street.

The Brandywine Valley wind your way along the banks of the Brandywine River through horse country and rich farmland. The rolling hills and verdant pastures along the Brandywine Valley Byway form a lovely and dramatic backdrop including Longwood Gardens, a stunning horticultural display set on the more than 1,000 aces of the former du Pont estate and the Brandywine River Museum, housed in a 19thcentury gristmill. Its unparalleled collection of works by three generations of Wyeth’s American illustration, still-life, and landscape paintings make it a mecca for art lovers from all over the world.

Brandywine Valley Wine Trails beautiful estate vineyards in the rolling hills of Chester County, charming tasting rooms and barrel-aging cellars filled with premium wines that showcase a unique terroir. Spanning scenic southeastern Pennsylvania between historic Philadelphia and the Amish countryside outside Lancaster, the four wineries of the Brandywine Valley Wine Trail are located within an easy drive of one another and are open year-round. Pennsylvania’s climate and terrain provide some of the best growing conditions on the east coast, allowing Brandywine Valley to be one of the state’s premier wine regions. Brandywine Valley’s bucolic countryside is home to many fine wineries. Make a stop at Chadds Ford Winery, the largest wine producer in the state or visit any of the unique, family farmed wineries along the Brandywine Artisan Wine Trail.

Historic Small-Town Travel Experiences in Chester County

Cultural Heritage · cultural itineraries · destination management · food and wine itineraries · Historic Towns · intercity transit · Italy · museums · public transit · Tradition · travel plan · Wine Trails

Historic Train Rides in Italy

Campania and Sicily in Original Locomotives and Railway Carriages

Travel aboard the original Centoporte and Corbellini carriages, which date back to the 1930s and 1950s, to visit some of the historic cultural and culinary sites in Campania region of Italy.

Pietrarsa runs from Naples to Portici along Italy’s first railway track. Inaugurated on October 3, 1839 by King Ferdinand II whose goal was to make his kingdom compete with the technological supremacy of England and France. The workshop was initially used to produce mechanical and pyrotechnical materials for the Navy, but later went on to build and repair locomotives and railway carriages. The very first locomotive made in Italy for the Royal Railroads bore the factory’s name. Pietrarsa was the first industrial complex in Italy, preceding the founding of Breda and Fiat by half a century.

Visit the Bourbon Dynasty Era Factory where Italy’s Rail History Begins

Reggia connects Naples with the Caserta Royal Palace. In 1750 King Charles of Bourbon (1716-1788), later king of Spain, decided to erect the Royal Palace as the ideal center of the new kingdom of Naples on the plains of Terra di Lavoro. The project was entrusted to the architect Luigi Vanvitelli (1700-1773), son of Gaspar Van Wittel, active under Pope Benedict XIV in the restoration of St. Peter’s dome in Rome.

Archaeo Train travels to the Roman and Magna Grecia archaeological sites of this region, including Pompeii, Herculaneum, Paestum and Velia.

Reduce Transit Times and Travel Cost on Your Next Trip

Travel Plans     Intercity & Local Transport

Sannio stops in S. Agata de’Goti, the region’s most beautiful borgo;

Telese Terme taste Falanghina and experience a wine tour of the vineyards;

Benevento area museums: Streghe, Egizio and Sannio as well as a tour of the Longobard era town; 

Padre Pio’s Pietrelcina, Fragneto Monforte e Pontelandolfo.

Sicily and Food by Train 87 municipalities are involved in the promotion of the island’s extensive culinary traditions along 50 itineraries traveling in carriages from bygone eras with diesel, electric, as well as a 1912 steam-driven locomotive to rediscover mountains and rural areas, borghi, castles, art and archaeological finds, parks and natural oases.

Explore Campania and Sicily Aboard Historic Trains

Business · Cultural Heritage · cultural itineraries · destination management · food and wine itineraries · Historic Towns · intercity transit · museums · Rivers · travel plan

Fort Worth Texas Cowboys Cowgirls and Culture

Cultural Heritage Museums Water Resources and the Environment Local Food Wine and Beer Public Transport Initiatives

Originally settled in 1849 as an army outpost along the Trinity River, Fort Worth was one of eight forts assigned to protect settlers on the advancing frontier. The cattle industry was king for a generation of people working the Fort Worth leg of the historic Chisholm Trail, which ran from the 1860s to the 1870s when the Texas & Pacific Railway arrived. In the years that followed, oil and aviation brought new wealth throughout the region.

The post-war years found Fort Worth capitalizing on its strengths as a transport, business and military center. Cultural pursuits included the development of the city’s internationally acclaimed museum district. The mid-1980s saw the start of a major revitalization of that city’s downtown and the introduction of Sundance Square, a 35-block commercial, residential, entertainment and retail district. Fort Worth’s red brick buildings and its Western heritage live on as visitors can experience the Old West beautifully preserved through the Stockyards National Historic District.

Food Brews and Spirits experience cowboy cuisine, trendy farm-to-table, authentic Mexican and bayou fare. Highlights include beef briskets, pork ribs and locally grown, organic artisan cheeses, alongside nicely paired wines. Artisanal distilleries offer straight bourbon, premium blended whiskey and vodka made from black-eyed peas. Also handcrafted beers, some brewed with milk, honey and sugar, accompanied by live music and local food trucks.

The Outdoors the Trinity Trails extend through Fort Worth for over 40 miles along the Trinity River with amenities for hikers, bikers, runners, and horseback riders with connections to the Stockyards, Downtown, the Zoo and the Cultural District. The Fort Worth Nature Center and Refuge is a 3621-acre preserved natural area designated by the Department of the Interior as a National Natural Landmark Site in 1980. Established in 1964 as the Greer Island Nature Center, it has small, genetically pure bison herd, a resident prairie dog town, and the prairie upon which they live. It is one of the largest urban parks of its type in the United States.

Museums renowned for their architecture and the quality of their collections, the Cultural District is home to six museums; Fort Worth is also home to museums devoted to Western heritage and the city’s colorful past. 

The National Cowgirl Museum and Hall of Fame is dedicated to honoring trailblazing women of the American West. Its multimedia exhibits and historic photographs, papers, clothing, spurs and saddles tell the stories of women pioneers, ranchers, performers and rodeo stars.

Log Cabin Village 19th century Texas nestled on three acres and nine historic structures, Texas history is portrayed through authentic log homes, a blacksmith shop, a one-room schoolhouse, smokehouse, water-powered gristmill and herb garden. Experience frontier chores, including candle making, spinning and weaving.

The Modern Art Museum maintains one of the foremost collections of international modern and contemporary art in the United States with works by Andy Warhol, Jackson Pollock, and Mark Rothko are displayed in a concrete and glass building surrounded by a reflecting pond.

The Kimbell Art Museum is a permanent collection with major works by Fra Angelico, Velazquez, Bernini, Rembrandt, Goya, Monet, Cezanne, Picasso, Mondrian and Matisse. It is also home to Michelangelo’s first known painting. The collection comprises Asian and non-Western as well as European art as well as traveling exhibits on display throughout the year.

The American Airlines Museum is dedicated to commercial aviation and the world of flight. Exhibits include hundreds of historical artifacts, photographs, full-scale aircraft engines and a rare Douglas DC-3 airliner.

Reduce Transit Times and Travel Cost on Your Fort Worth Trip

Travel Plans     Intercity & Local Transport

Transportation it is easy to get around Fort Worth or travel to nearby and Dallas and Grapevine. 

Bus the T – Fort Worth Transport Authority – provides extensive service throughout the city and its cultural attractions.

Rail the TRE – Trinity Rail Express – connects Fort Worth and Dallas with transfer access to DFW International Airport.

Air DFW is only 17.5 miles from downtown Fort Worth via bus, rail or taxi service. From here, you can reach any major city in the U.S. in less than four hours.

Walking is a wonderful way to experience the city’ entertainment districts and the Trinity Trails.

Bike Sharing: Bike sharing is an inexpensive, healthy and environmentally friendly way to get around Fort Worth. Pick up a bike at any of the 40 docking stations.

Plan Your Fort Worth and Texas Business Trip or Vacation

Business · canals · destination management · food and wine itineraries · Historic Towns · intercity transit · Italy · Lakes · museums · Travel · travel plan

Milan Italy

Art Architecture Cuisine Design Fashion and Shopping

Milan is located between the Po River, the Alps and Italian lakes region. The concentric layout of the city center has been influenced by the Navigli, an ancient system of navigable and interconnected canals, now mostly covered. There are only few remains of the ancient Roman colony of Mediolanum. Following the edict of Milan in 313 A.D., several basilicas were built by the city gates, still standing and refurbished over the centuries. The cathedral was built between 1386 and 1577, is the fifth largest in the world and the most important example of Gothic architecture in Italy. In the 15th century, an old fortress was enlarged and embellished to become the Castello Sforzesco, the seat of an elegant Renaissance court surrounded by a walled hunting park.

Economy the Milan metro area generates approximately 9% of the national GDP and is home to more than 8 percent of all businesses in Italy, including many media and advertising agencies. Milan is a major world fashion center – 12,000 companies, 800 show rooms, and 6,000 sales outlets – and manufacturing center. Other important products made here include chemicals, machinery, pharmaceuticals and plastics. Other key sectors in the city’s economy are advanced research in health and biotechnologies, engineering, banking and finance.

Museums and Art Galleries the Brera Portrait Gallery holds one of the foremost collections of Italian paintings. The Sforza Castle hosts numerous art collections and exhibitions, especially statues, ancient arms and furniture. Leonardo Da Vinci worked here from 1482 until 1499 and was commissioned to paint the Virgin of the Rocks and the Last Supper. Milan was affected by the Baroque in the 17th and 18th centuries, hosting numerous artists, architects and painters of that period, such as Caravaggio. In the 20th century, the city was the epicenter of the Futurist artistic movement. The Museo del Novecento is a 20th Century art gallery with sections dedicated to Futurism, Spatialism and Poor Art.

Reduce Transit Times and Travel Cost in Milan and Italy

Travel Plans     Intercity & Local Transport

Music Milan is a major national and international center of the performing arts, most notably opera. La Scala is considered one of the most prestigious opera houses in the world, hosting the premieres of numerous operas since the mid19th century. Other major theatres in Milan include the Arcimboldi and the Lirico.The city also has a renowned symphony orchestra, conservatory and is a major center for musical composition.

Fashion and Shopping a global capital in industrial design, fashion and architecture, Milan is the commercial capital of Italy and one of Europe’s most dynamic cities, it accounts for the lion’s share of the fashion trade, with some of the most renowned fashion houses headquartered here. Its upscale fashion district and Galleria, the world’s first shopping mall, offer the best shopping opportunities. 

Architecture and Design the city’s modern skyscrapers and unique liberty style office and apartment buildings make it a trend setter in architecture. Milan is also a leader in high-quality furniture and interior design and is home to Europe’s largest permanent trade exhibition – Fiera Milano – and one of the most prestigious international furniture and design fairs. Milan has recently undergone a massive urban renewal with several famous architects taking part in projects such as EXPO 2015.

Food and Wine home to a proud culinary tradition, Milan specialties include classic dishes like cotoletta alla milanese, cassoeula, stewed pork rib chops and sausage with cabbage, ossobuco, risotto, busecca and brasato, salami and gorgonzola cheese. Sweets include chiacchiere, panettone and tortelli. World-renowned restaurants and cafés can be found in the historic center, Brera and Navigli districts.

Business and Vacation Travel to Milan and Italy

Cultural Heritage · cultural itineraries · destination management · food and wine itineraries · Historic Towns · intercity transit · Italy · Tradition · travel plan · Wine Trails

Venetian Countryside Food and Wine Itineraries

Cooking Classes and Culinary Tours

Veneto is the most productive wine area in Italy and a unique area where the flavors of the local products combine to create delicious dishes, both in traditional and innovative ways. When natural products are put together to create a dish, the choice of ingredients and the way they are combined, cooked, and eaten are a function of identity, lifestyle and social status.

Reduce Transit Times and Travel Cost on Your Next Trip

Travel Plans   

  Intercity & Local Transport

Cooking classes designed to acquaint you with Venice and its territory by explaining how these local dishes developed and changed over the centuries. Learn to cook a savory risotto al radicchio, sweet white asparagus, baccalà, corn meal with boiled baby shrimp seasoned with Italian dressing, homemade noodles with basil pesto and scampi.

Tiramisù was created in Treviso just 40 km from Venice

Wine tours include an overview of the issues facing winemakers and how they retain family traditions and preserve the local environment. The Prosecco Wine Hills visit includes stops at local wine cellars, an ancient abbey and an imposing medieval castle

Medieval Treviso walk along its narrow, pebbled streets and chic boutiques. Learn the history and mysteries of the city known as the Garden of Venice. Have lunch in a typical restaurant and enjoy a typical Spritz with Cicheti in a local Cicchetteria.

Venetian Villas participate in a typical cooking class, where you will learn some of the secrets of the Venetian cuisine, in a charming Venetian Villa designed by Palladio and walk through the medieval village of Asolo, a widespread museum.

Connect for Travel to Venice and the Veneto Region of Italy

Cultural Heritage · cultural itineraries · food and wine itineraries · Historic Towns · intercity transit · museums · travel plan

Texas Hill Country Small Towns

Fredericksburg, Gruene, Lockhart, Luckenbach, Poteet, Round Top and Wimberley

Fredericksburg is known for its German heritage, antiquing, wineries, Oktoberfest celebration and the Enchanted Rock, a massive bald dome of Texas granite that is a hiking, bouldering, and spelunking destination.

The Starting Point to Visit Texas Hill Country Wineries

Founded in 1846, the town is also notable as the home of Texas German, a dialect spoken by the first generations of German settlers who initially refused to learn English. The birthplace of Admiral Chester Nimitz, the Fredericksburg Historic District was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1970.

Gruene is a historic community between San Antonio and Austin, home to country’s oldest dance hall, the Gruene general store, numerous bars and antique shops, tubing and rafting outfitters. Built in 1878 by Henry D. Gruene, Gruene Hall by design has not physically changed since it was first built.

Lockhart was originally called Plum Creek. The town’s economic growth began with the arrival of the railroad in the late 19thcentury and its role as a regional shipping center for local cotton. Lockhart has several claims to fame: Barbecue Capital of Texas, the Dr. Eugene Clark Library is the oldest operating public library in the state, a Victorian post-frontier American town and host to many film sets.

Luckenbach is a laid-back music and entertainment destination. Its oldest building is a combination of general store and saloon. First named Grape Creek, the name comes from the German words lucken (gap) and bach (stream), it was first established as a trading post, one of a few that never broke a peace treaty with the Comanche with whom they traded. Today Luckenbach maintains a ghost-town feel with its small population and strong western aesthetic.

Poteet is south of San Antonio and is home to the Strawberry Festival with country music, live auctions, a rodeo, a carnival, and strawberry-themed foods.

Round Top is a town with artists, antique shops, and bed & breakfast inns nestled between Austin and Houston on U.S. 290. Originally named for early settler Nathaniel Townsend, the town was renamed since the postmaster lived in a house with a round tower. Renowned for its antique show, Royers Café pies and its arts scene. Every summer, the town hosts students at the Festive Hill music institute and the Shakespeare program, which provide symphonic and theatrical performances for locals and visitors; the Winedale Historical Center is just down the road from Round Top.

The James Dick Foundation for the Performing Arts and its Round Top Festival Institute were founded in 1971 by world-renowned concert pianist James Dick. Begun with a handful of gifted young pianists in rented space on the town square, the project is now an internationally acclaimed music institute for aspiring young musicians and distinguished faculty.

Festival Hill contains major performance facilities, historic houses, extensive gardens, parks and nature preserves. Through its singular collection of rare books, manuscripts, archival material, music and historic recordings, photographs and objects, Round Top Festival Institute is also known as an important center for research and scholarly study.

Wimberley started as a trading post settlement near Cypress Creek in 1848, Over the years, the local mill was expanded to process lumber, shingles, flour, molasses, and cotton. Today, it hosts arts, crafts and other events.

Reduce Transit Times and Travel Cost on Your Next Trip

Travel Plans     Intercity & Local Transport

Cultural Heritage · cultural itineraries · destination management · food and wine itineraries · Historic Towns · Tradition · Transit Calculator · Travel · Travel Plan Fees

Jasper Indiana

German Festivals Wood Capital and Historic Commercial Buildings

Jasper is strategically located one-hour northeast of Evansville, 2 1/2 hours southwest of Indianapolis,1 1/2 hours west of Louisville and 3 hours east of St. Louis, this community is consistently ranked among the best small towns to live in Indiana and the United States, start a business as well as one of the safest.  

The Wood Capital of the World is home to many furniture companies and the Indiana Baseball Hall of Fame, which honors players and others associated with the national pastime who were born or lived in Indiana.

The Jasper post office has been in operation since 1832

The Jasper Strassenfest is a celebration between Jasper and its German sister-city Pfaffenweiler, a small village in southwest Germany; the four-day event is held annually during the first weekend in August. Visitors from Germany travel to Jasper around this time of year. The street festival encompasses the entire city square, complete with food stands, rides, a Biergarten and over 1,300 pounds of bratwurst. The Strassenfest culminates in a Sunday parade and evening fireworks. The festival also features a golf tournament, beauty pageant, box parade, fishing tournament, and a network of German Polka Masses at the three Roman Catholic parishes: St. Joseph’s, Holy Family, and Precious Blood.

Louis H. Sturm Hardware Store is a historic commercial building built about 1850; the three-story, three bay, Italianate style brick building houses the oldest continuously operated commercial retail business in Jasper.

Environment the 75-acre central park features two miles of trails, 25 acres of woods and wetlands utilized for nature studies as well as an indoor public event space, musical playground and four exercise pods.

Connect for Your Travel to Jasper and Indiana

Shared Mobility Calculator     Intercity Travel Costs     US Trip Planner