Cultural Heritage · cultural itineraries · destination management · food and wine itineraries · Friends and Family Travel · Historic Towns · intercity transit · Italy · Tradition · travel plan · Wine Trails

Amalfi Coast Food and Travel

Terra Furoris, Land of Furor, is the ancient name of this community in the hills above the Amalfi Coast; it symbolizes the fury of the sea inside its fjord. This area produces pomodorini and a vine with a terroir – Costa d´Amalfi Doc – unique in Europe.

Furore’s Vineyards produce high quality reds and whites, appreciated around the world, including in a cantina built into the rocks and others that extend for just a few hectares, given the characteristics of this territory, fruit of the local labor and its talents, cultivated in pockets of land carved from mountains, rocks and the sea. 

Furore is one of Italy’s most beautiful borgos

The Cuisine here is representative of the landscape’s variety:

Pasta in the Costiera includes ‘ndunderi, a large-gnocchi with ricotta, semola and spices, recognized by Unesco and made with spelt flour; it traces its origins from Roman times.

Colatura di Alici di Cetara, evolved from the Roman garum, is a local sauce, typical of this area, resulting from the natural process of preserving anchovies.

Dairy Specialties such as ricotta, fior di latte, provola and caciocavalli are still produced by several artisan shops in the nearby town of Tramonti.

Sfusato Amalfitano a Lemon utilized in making Limoncello

Local Culinary Traditions can be experienced with the catch of the day, combined with vegetables and Mediterranean macchia herbs producing dishes such as swordfish cooked in lemon leaves, parmigiana with anchovies, tuna in a genovese sauce, squid and potatoes, the latter especially popular with the local farmer-fishermen and their very large families.

A Cuisine that captures and blends scents from land and sea: migliaccio, minestra maritata and caponata are among the dishes typically found at local restaurants.

Reduce Transit Times and Travel Costs on Your Next Trip

Travel Plans     Intercity & Local Transport

Monasteries Monks and Nuns have experimented and contributed to all this with a judicious use of lemons, fennel, laurel, nuts and wild strawberries, creating sweets and preserves, the Santa Rosa cake, bocconotto, melanzane with chocolate and even the famed caprese.

Pizza is another local tradition, exported by the over three thousand Tramonti pizzaioli who have traveled all over the world.

Food and Travel on the Amalfi Coast

Build Operate Transfer · Business · Cogeneration · Conservation · destination management · Efficiency · Energy Savings Plan · entrepreneurs · Historic District · Historic Towns · renewable energy · Resilience · Sustainable Communities · water quality

Energy and Water Project Funding

Small and Medium-sized Commercial Buildings account for 95 percent of building stock and consume half the energy in a sector of the economy responsible for 20 percent of the total energy consumption. Owners of smaller buildings are often unaware of the amount of energy wasted and the opportunity for savings that building automation systems provide. This sector hasn’t BAS for the following reasons: the high cost of tailoring software and acquiring hardware components is beyond the reach of most small- and medium-sized properties; the owner is not always the tenant that pays the utility bill, hence limited incentive to invest in the building’s energy efficiency.

Building Leases spell out how energy costs are divided between tenants and owners. Often, these leases are not structured in a way that promotes energy savings. Tenants have no incentive to save energy in their leased premises because energy costs are based on tenant square footage. Building owners have no incentive to invest in energy efficiency because the operating expenses are passed onto tenants. 

Green Leases promote energy efficiency by creating lease structures which equitably align the costs and benefits of efficiency investments between building owners and tenants.

Energy Management Systems can be used to centrally control devices like HVAC units and lighting systems across multiple locations. EMS also provide metering, sub-metering and monitoring functions that allow facility managers to gather data and insight to make more informed decisions about energy activities across their sites.

Distributed Generation occurs on a property site when energy is sold to the building occupants; here, commercial PPAs enable businesses and governments to purchase electricity directly from the generator rather than from the utility. Power Purchase Agreements PPA is a legal contract between an electricity generator and a power purchaser.

Financing Energy Efficiency Projects face several financial impediments, including information. Financial institutions often lack a full understanding of energy efficiency technologies which are almost always investments with long repayment terms. Small towns and rural communities require specific and unique knowledge, expertise and funding sources.

A Power Purchase Agreement PPA is a legal contract between an electricity generator and a power purchaser. Contractual terms may last anywhere between 5 and 20 years, during which time the power purchaser buys energy, and sometimes also capacity and services, from the electricity generator. Such agreements play a key role in the financing of independently owned electricity generating assets. The seller is typically an independent power producer – IPP.

PPAs Facilitate the Financing of Distributed Generation Assets

Distributed Generation occurs on a property site with energy is sold to the building occupants; here, commercial PPAs enable businesses and governments to purchase electricity directly from the generator rather than from the utility. The parties involved include: The Seller is the entity that owns the project. In most cases, the seller is organized as a special purpose entity whose main purpose is to facilitate project financing, and The Buyer is typically a utility or building occupants under the distributed generation scenario.

Water Resources Strategies on Main Street and Historic Districts

Urban Flooding many small towns across the country lose drinking water because of aging pipes, in addition, asphalt and concrete prevent rainwater from soaking into the ground. The solution to inadequate storm water and drinking water management: green infrastructure like rain gardens and bios wales.

Aging Pipes and Outdated Systems Waste 14 percent of Daily Water Consumption

Water Losses from aging infrastructure and faulty metering lead to lost revenue for utilities and higher rates for water users. Also, increasing demand, maintenance and energy costs are responsible for a 90% increase in utility rates. This trend can be countered by best management practices BMP that include state-of-the-art audits, leak detection monitoring, targeted repairs and upgrades, pressure management, and better metering technologies. 

Integrated Water Systems in Small Towns and Rural Communities by 2030 the world will need to produce 50 percent more for food and energy and 30 percent more fresh water. Solar pumps are reliable technology which can compete with conventional pumping technologies such as diesel pumping. Large amounts of energy are used in the entire water cycle. Water Pumps play a major role in all water and waste-water processes.

Tell us about Your Energy and Water Plans

Cultural Heritage · cultural itineraries · destination management · Friends and Family Travel · Historic District · Historic Towns · intercity transit · Italy · museums · Travel · travel plan

Medieval Castles and Etruscan Cities

Lazio History Culture and Archaeology

History Lazio gets its name from the Latini, a people who arrived in the area in the second millennium BC. This Indo-European population established itself on the Palatine hill and eventually expanded to the other six hills of Rome. The region was home to the Etruscans, north of the Tiber river, the Latins in the center, the Falisci in an area in between Etruscans and Latins, and the Capenati, an italic people heavily influenced in language and customs by the Sabines, the Latins and Etruscans.

Archaeology Lazio is among the richest archeological regions in the world, with major Etruscan cities such as: Cerveteri, Tarquinia, Vulci, Veio and Volsini that peaked between the VII and V Centuries BC. Our trip begins in Vulci, an ancient Etruscan city suddenly overwhelmed by the advancing tide of Rome; a walk through the princely tombs of its Necropolis confirms the glorious and lavish past of the Etruscan aristocracy. A majestic silhouette stands out in the background: the medieval castle of the Abbey, which towers over the Fiora river valley. Next, the Niki de Saint Phalle Tarot Garden, a unique theme park.

The First Monasteries in Central Italy appeared around 529 and the Founding of Monte Cassino Abbey

Via Appia Antica the Regina Viarum has been traveled by millions of people over the past two millennia. Via Appia linked Rome with Southern Italy; along the way, you will discover monuments, clues about who built and owned them, and the Catacombs. Then, a rustic and appetizing lunch al fresco under a pergola.

Reduce Transit Times and Travel Costs on Your Next Trip

Travel Plans     Intercity & Local Transport

Castles and Museums the area just south and east of Rome, known as the Castelli Romani e Prenestini, comprises a network of museums and archeological sites in several small historic towns. These twenty cultural venues are representative of the area’s rich historic, artistic and cultural heritage in: History and Archeology; Anthropology; Science and the Environment; Culture and Religion.

A unique opportunity for vacationing families and culture professionals alike to walk ancient trails, become acquainted with old traditions and visit: small historic towns, churches and convents, medieval palaces, Roman aqueducts and imperial navy ships, a wine producing town and even a toy museum.

Travel in the Company of People who Live and Work in Etruscan Cities and Medieval Towns

Atlantic Coast · canals · Conservation · Cultural Heritage · cultural itineraries · destination management · food and wine itineraries · Friends and Family Travel · Historic Towns · intercity transit · museums · Tradition · travel plan · waterways · Wine Trails

Mid-Atlantic Rivers Canals and Trails

in the Hudson Delaware and Susquehanna Valleys

The Hudson Valley extends 150 miles above the tip of Manhattan. Designated as a National Heritage Area, the valley is steeped in history, natural beauty, culture, food and farmers’ markets. The first Dutch settlement was established at Fort Nassau, a trading post south of present-day Albany, in the early 17th century, with the purpose of exchanging European goods for beaver pelts. During the French and Indian War in the 1750s, the northern end of the valley became the bulwark of the British defense against French invasion from Canada via Lake Champlain.The valley also became one of the major regions of conflict during the American Revolution.

Dutchess County is 800 square miles of natural scenic beauty, historic and cultural landmarks, and outdoor recreation. Stroll the Walkway Over the Hudson. Tour and taste along the Dutchess Wine Trail. Explore the homes of FDR and Vanderbilt. Taste new creations at The Culinary Institute of America. Fill the pantry at farm markets. Cruise the Hudson River. 

Rockland County is located just 30 miles north of New York City and is known for its quaint villages, spectacular river views and outdoor recreation with 32,000 acres of parklands dotted with sparkling lakes and streams rushing down to the Hudson. Miles marked trails lead right to the foothills of the Ramapo Mountains. 

Coal Iron Steel and Canals of the Delaware and Lehigh Valleys

The Delaware and Lehigh five county region of Northeastern Pennsylvania developed in the late 18thCentury as a result of the anthracite mines, the iron and steel industries, and the canals that were built to reach Philadelphia and other markets. 

165 miles of nature history preservation recreation and education

From its origins as a means to transport anthracite coal from the mines of Luzerne and Carbon County to the markets in the Lehigh Valley and Philadelphia, the D&L Trail is now a multi-use trail originating from the mountains of northeast Pennsylvania through the rivers and communities of the Lehigh Valley and Bucks County. 

Philadelphia the Brandywine Valley and Wilmington Delaware

In Philadelphia, the waterfront is now a walking and biking destination which covers 6 miles. Trail features include streetscape improvements along the entire waterfront trail, a bi-directional bikeway, pedestrian walkway and rain gardens that will collect the first inch of storm water, relieving the city sewer system during major weather events, as well as benches and bike racks, decorative street pavers, and innovative solar trail lighting.

The Christina Riverfront is one of many reasons for exploring the Delaware culture trail; cruise in a water taxi or stroll the landscaped Riverwalk. Wilmington was the last stop to freedom on the Underground Railroad; the Tubman-Garrett Riverfront Park is named for Underground Railroad Conductor Harriett Tubman and Stationmaster Thomas Garrett.

Brandywine Creek is a tributary of the Christina River in southeastern Pennsylvania and northern Delaware. The 20.4-mile Lower Brandywine is a designated Pennsylvania Scenic River with several tributary streams.

Harrisburg and the Susquehanna River Valley

The Susquehanna River is 464 miles (747 km) long and is the longest river on the US East Coast. With its watershed, it is the 16th-largest river in the United States, and the longest river in the continental United States without commercial boat traffic today. In the Canal Era, navigation improvements were made to enhance the river for barge shipping of bulk goods by water on the Pennsylvania Canal.

Harrisburg, the Capital of Pennsylvania, was inhabited by Native Americans as early as 3000 BC. Known as Peixtin, the area was an important trading post for Native American traders, as trails leading from the Delaware to the Ohio Rivers, and from the Potomac to the Upper Susquehanna intersected there.

An Architectural and Heritage Itinerary

Downtown Lancaster offers a unique experience with historic buildings of different architectural styles and periods and three centuries of civic, commercial, religious, social and architectural history. A leisurely walk can be accomplished in less than an hour. 

Reduce Transit Times and Travel Costs on Your Next Trip

Travel Plans     Intercity & Local Transport

Cultural Heritage · cultural itineraries · destination management · Friends and Family Travel · Historic Towns · intercity transit · Italy · Maritime Heritage · Travel · travel plan · waterways

Southern Italy Castles and Coastal Towers

The History of Coastal Towers goes hand in hand the political and military evolution of the Kingdom of Naples.Fortifications were built in Southern Italy over and eight-hundred-year period from the 9th to the 17th centuries. The original towers were cylindrical in shape, tall and with small windows. Their main function was to sound the alarm when pirate ships were sighted through the lightning of fires, allowing the local population to find shelter into the hills and grottoes inland from the coast.

rhgf

Increased Raids during the 16th Century led to Development of More Complex Coastal Defenses

Naples Viceroy Don Pedro of Toledo ordered the construction of massive, square-shaped towers with thicker external walls. The transition from circular-shaped towers to square-shaped ones was spurred by the introduction of artillery requiring fortifications whose functions now included sighting, signaling, shelter as well as the use of offensive weapons that could hit a ship approaching the coast.

Communications were carried out through a series of visual signals – smoke in the daytime, fires by night as well as acoustic signals such as bells, or shots from a cannon or arquebus, a precursor of the rifle. When a pirate ship was sighted from one tower, one of these signals would be used to warn the people of the area to prepare to fight or flee. The signal would be passed from tower to tower, up and down the coast, passing the word quickly and effectively. The ground level floor had no windows and was set directly above a large cistern to guarantee a constant water supply. This space was used to store food and munitions and also contained a millstone for grinding wheat, making the tower self-sufficient.

Saracen Towers can be viewed along the Southern Italian coastline from Gaeta to the Sorrento peninsula, the Amalfi and Cilento coasts. There are over 350 towers, including 30 along the coastal strip from Vietri sul Mare to Positano. Some have been restored and incorporated into modern buildings in small harbors such as San Marco, Pisciotta and Marina di Camerota. Further south, around Cape Infreschi just before reaching Scario, there are cliffs along the coast unreachable by road; here the original coastal towers stand just a few hundred yards apart.

The Term Saracen has shifted over time. Ptolemy’s Geography from the second century mentions Sarakene as a region in the northern Sinai Peninsula and refers to a people called the Sarakenoi. For Italians during the middle ages it meant Muslim invader, from the Arabs who rode the initial wave of Islamic expansion into Spain and Sicily in the 8th and 9thcenturies to the Ottoman Turks who took Constantinople in the 15th century.

Coastal Watchtowers were also as a point of reference for friendly ships. The towers were generally manned by a military team of four guards and a horseman, who often remained outside the tower ready to ride into town to carry a warning as soon as possible.

Reduce Transit Times and Travel Costs on Your Next Italy Trip

Travel Plans     Intercity & Local Transport

canals · Cultural Heritage · cultural itineraries · destination management · Friends and Family Travel · Historic District · Historic Towns · intercity transit · museums · Travel · travel plan

Washington County Maryland

Arts Entertainment and a Civil War Legacy

Hagerstown located in Western Maryland it features a distinct topography, formed by stone ridges running from northeast to southwest through the center of town defining its neighborhoods. These ridges consist of upper Stonehenge limestone; the older buildings were built from this stone which is easily quarried and dressed onsite. Several of Hagerstown’s churches are constructed of Stonehenge limestone; brick and concrete eventually displaced this native stone.

Hub City German immigrant Jonathan Hager built the first house here in 1739 and began laying out the town in 1762. Hager House still stands as a carefully preserved museum, giving visitors a window to the 18th century. The National Road brought growth and the railroads intersecting here gave it its nickname, “Hub City.” The largest Civil War cavalry battle fought in an urban setting happened here.

City Park offers 50 acres of beautiful outdoor space and Hagerstown City Farmers Market sells crafts and baked goods as well as homegrown produce from area farmers.

The Arts & Entertainment District is home to the Maryland Theatre’s year-round performances and events, including Maryland Symphony Orchestra concerts. Hagerstown is also home to the Western Maryland Blues Fest. The Washington County Museum of Fine Arts is in scenic City Park.

The Hagerstown Cultural Trail links the Arts District with City Park and Fine Arts Museum

A Transit Center, Hagerstown is the chief commercial and industrial hub for a Tri-State Area that includes much of Western Maryland as well as portions of South-Central Pennsylvania and Eastern West Virginia.

Reduce Transit Times and Travel Costs on Your Next Trip

Travel Plans     Intercity & Local Transport

Washington County is home to many quaint towns, including:

Boonsboro founded by relatives of Daniel Boone and situated along the main road to Hagerstown and Frederick. Historic markers explain the National Road, Civil War battles, and quaint shops line Main Street including author Nora Roberts’ bookstore and bed and breakfast.
Clear Spring is located 12 miles west of Hagerstown. The historic National Pike which once linked the port of Baltimore to the western frontier of Ohio, runs through the center of town. Area attractions include Knob Hall Winery, Whitetail Mountain Resort, the C&O Canal and Fort Frederick State Park.

Explore the C&O Canal Towpath and the Western Maryland Rail Trail

Civil War Legacy Sharpsburg was the place where two massive armies clashed, leaving 23,110 dead, wounded, or missing. Every building overflowed with the wounded and dying. After the Civil War, its population declined; today, it has fewer than 700 residents, many direct descendants of families here during the Civil War. The Antietam National Battlefield and the Antietam National Cemetery are part of Sharpsburg, and nearby museums such as the Pry House Field Hospital Museum attract international symposiums. Smithsburg played a role in the Civil War, when residents helped care for wounded soldiers after the battles of Gettysburg, Monterey, South Mountain, and Antietam.

Williamsport is located at the confluence of Conococheague Creek and the Potomac River. When the C&O Canal opened in 1834, it evolved into a thriving waterfront town. It was also once considered a potential site for the United States’ capital.

Williamsport is the Finish Line for the JFK 50 Mile the Oldest Ultra-Marathon in North America

Cultural Heritage · cultural itineraries · destination management · Friends and Family Travel · Historic Towns · intercity transit · Italy · Tradition · travel plan

Traditions and Folklore in Rome and Lazio

Capena Viterbo Marta Oriolo Romano Gradoli Latina Frosinone

Rome on August 5 it snows in the eternal city. Rose petals fall on the congregation in the Santa Maria Maggiore Basilica. This event is a re-enactment of the snowfall that took place on the Esquilino hill on this day in 352, when the Virgin Mary indicated to Pope Liberio the location where the church should be built.

Capena before dawn, every January 13, a large oak log is lit. As flames ember, all the citizens light up a cigarette; this very ancient tradition ends with a benediction of the animals and a parade of local horses dressed in vivacious colors

Viterbo celebrates Santa Rosa on September 4 with a procession led by a very large statue of the saint placed on an elaborate cart; the first one dates-back to 1663. 

Reduce Transit Times and Travel Costs on Your Next Italy Trip

Travel Plans     Intercity & Local Transport

Marta on May 14, a procession of the Chiesa della Santissima del Monte: a wooden stand is carried by four persons holding an image of the Madonna adorned with fruits and flowers followed by the clergy and citizenry parading in groups representative of their trades.

Oriolo Romano a unique celebration takes place on August 15 – Ferragosto; a long procession accompanies the statue of the Virgin Mary of the Star along the streets of this XVI Century medieval borgo, built as an ideal town by the Church, an early example of a planned community!

The Venue for a Rodeo by the Butteri of Maremma, the Cowboys of Southern Tuscany

Gradoli on Fat Tuesday, members of the Purgatory Fraternity, wearing black hoods, parade through the town’s streets led by banners and drums, knocking on doors to collect food for the Dinner in Purgatory eaten on Ash Wednesday.

Latina Tuesday is market day: bancarelle with new and used clothes, home furnishings, fruits and vegetables. Best day to visit is the first Tuesday of the month when, it is claimed, new and fresh stuff arrives! 

Frosinone a feast known as Radeca may have pre-Christian origins. Frosinone is a very old town and this event may have its roots in pagan fertility and procreation rituals. The long radeca leaf represents the agave, the ancient symbol of fertility. The event takes place on July 26 to celebrate an insurrection against the Roman Republic and the French army that protected it.