Cultural Heritage · cultural itineraries · food and wine itineraries · Historic Towns · intercity transit · museums · travel plan

Texas Hill Country Small Towns

Fredericksburg, Gruene, Lockhart, Luckenbach, Poteet, Round Top and Wimberley

Fredericksburg is known for its German heritage, antiquing, wineries, Oktoberfest celebration and the Enchanted Rock, a massive bald dome of Texas granite that is a hiking, bouldering, and spelunking destination.

The Starting Point to Visit Texas Hill Country Wineries

Founded in 1846, the town is also notable as the home of Texas German, a dialect spoken by the first generations of German settlers who initially refused to learn English. The birthplace of Admiral Chester Nimitz, the Fredericksburg Historic District was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1970.

Gruene is a historic community between San Antonio and Austin, home to country’s oldest dance hall, the Gruene general store, numerous bars and antique shops, tubing and rafting outfitters. Built in 1878 by Henry D. Gruene, Gruene Hall by design has not physically changed since it was first built.

Lockhart was originally called Plum Creek. The town’s economic growth began with the arrival of the railroad in the late 19thcentury and its role as a regional shipping center for local cotton. Lockhart has several claims to fame: Barbecue Capital of Texas, the Dr. Eugene Clark Library is the oldest operating public library in the state, a Victorian post-frontier American town and host to many film sets.

Luckenbach is a laid-back music and entertainment destination. Its oldest building is a combination of general store and saloon. First named Grape Creek, the name comes from the German words lucken (gap) and bach (stream), it was first established as a trading post, one of a few that never broke a peace treaty with the Comanche with whom they traded. Today Luckenbach maintains a ghost-town feel with its small population and strong western aesthetic.

Poteet is south of San Antonio and is home to the Strawberry Festival with country music, live auctions, a rodeo, a carnival, and strawberry-themed foods.

Round Top is a town with artists, antique shops, and bed & breakfast inns nestled between Austin and Houston on U.S. 290. Originally named for early settler Nathaniel Townsend, the town was renamed since the postmaster lived in a house with a round tower. Renowned for its antique show, Royers Café pies and its arts scene. Every summer, the town hosts students at the Festive Hill music institute and the Shakespeare program, which provide symphonic and theatrical performances for locals and visitors; the Winedale Historical Center is just down the road from Round Top.

The James Dick Foundation for the Performing Arts and its Round Top Festival Institute were founded in 1971 by world-renowned concert pianist James Dick. Begun with a handful of gifted young pianists in rented space on the town square, the project is now an internationally acclaimed music institute for aspiring young musicians and distinguished faculty.

Festival Hill contains major performance facilities, historic houses, extensive gardens, parks and nature preserves. Through its singular collection of rare books, manuscripts, archival material, music and historic recordings, photographs and objects, Round Top Festival Institute is also known as an important center for research and scholarly study.

Wimberley started as a trading post settlement near Cypress Creek in 1848, Over the years, the local mill was expanded to process lumber, shingles, flour, molasses, and cotton. Today, it hosts arts, crafts and other events.

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Build Operate Transfer · Business · Commerce · Conservation · destination management · Efficiency · Geography · Historic Towns · intercity transit · microtransit · Mobility · Travel

Build Operate and Transfer Projects

Travel Mobility Services Energy Efficiency and Water Conservation

The Concept a program anchored in communities with a history as hub cities, hence a reliance on connections and collaborations within and among regions, resulting in a national trading platform with economies of scale utilizing historic trade routes and state of the art products and services to the benefit of community commuters, residents and visitors.

The Objective achieve economies of scale pricing in selected communities around the US in the areas of travel, destination management, transit, 5G, energy efficiency and water conservation.

Ways and Means a build operate and transfer project, unique to each community but connecting participating towns via customer sharing, transit programs, energy management and similar measures.

Participants a team of product and services providers who provide know-how and resources to jump-start projects in collaboration with local partners.

The BOT is established for a set duration – 18 to 24 months, renewable – with transfer to local partners, inclusive of training for local individuals, existing businesses, local government and nonprofits, where applicable.

Client Targets: US and International Vacationers, Business Travelers and Commuters

Connecting air and rail metro hubs with micropolitan communities via

Intercity Multimodal and Local Micro Transit hub and spoke services to

Leverage travel client relationships and engage local product and service providers in:

travel related value-added services    transportation   

 energy efficiency    water conservation

Creating Virtual Hotels and improving Customer Service.

A Team Tasked with Developing Deploying Managing and Marketing Systems and Tools that Benefit Your Community

hub and spoke transport · intercity transit · Last Mile · Logistics · microtransit · Mobility · mobility network · paratransit · private transport · public transit · Transit Calculator · Travel

The Corriera Service

Intercity and Local Mobility

Corriera is an intercity and local door-to-door mobility service designed to connect air and rail service in large cities with micropolitan areas to benefit time-sensitive business travelers, vacationing families, groups and long-distance commuters; the service is carried out in collaboration with local and regional partners across the Upper Midwest, the South Central, Southeast and Mid-Atlantic regions of the United States.

Simple and Affordable All–Inclusive Rates

Corriera leverages appropriate technologies to place customers within reach of public and private transport services through intercity ride-sharing and micro transit services designed to provide first and last-mile connections that benefit:

  • vacationers who can maximize sightseeing time and reduce accommodation costs,
  • business travelers visiting multiple locations in a compressed timeframe, and
  • long-distance commuters.

Corriera is Italian for Motor Coach

A Mobility Network designed to deliver services across the spectrum of transit modes and providers to benefit local and regional customers.

Customer Centered Sustainable Transit Solutions

Mobility Management that improves coordination among public transportation and other service providers as well as increase service options in underserved and rural communities, seniors and persons with disabilities.

Terms of Service

Corriera is inclusive of insurance, taxes, tolls, fuel and driver services, city to city and transfers, where applicable. Tips are not included.

Persons Cost
in Group Person/Mile
   
1 $1.00
2 $0.80
3 $0.60
4 $0.40
5 + $0.20

Cancellation you may cancel your reservations without penalty at any time prior to trip start. We also reserve the right to cancel and/or modify your travel plans as required depending on weather conditions and other circumstances that are beyond our control.

Payments The Circle Payment Service is Free There is no charge to send or receive money and if you send between currencies you see the exchange rate in the app before you send a payment and there are no exchange rate markups or fees.

At Your Service to Help Reduce the Time and Cost of Your Next Transport Experience

Commerce · Efficiency · hub and spoke transport · intercity transit · Last Mile · Logistics · mobility network · optic fiber · Performance

Telecom and Energy Networks First and Last Miles

The last mile or last kilometer is a term widely used in the telecommunication, energy and transportation industries to deliver services to retail customers; specifically, it refers to the portion of the network chain that physically reaches the end-user’s premises. The word mile is a metaphor because the last mile of a network to the user is conversely the first mile from the user’s premises to the outside world when the user is sending data or initiating a transport service.

The Speed Bottleneck in networks occurs in the last/first mile; bandwidth effectively limits the data that can be delivered to the customer because networks have relatively few high capacity trunk channels branching out to feed many final mile clients. The final mile links, being the most numerous and thus most expensive part of the system, as well as having to interface with a wide variety of user equipment, are the most difficult to upgrade to new technology. Phone trunk lines that carry calls between switching centers are made of optical-fiber but the last mile is a technology which has remained unchanged for over a century since the original laying of copper phone cables.

The term last mile has expanded outside the communications industries to include other distribution networks that deliver goods to customers, such as the pipes that deliver water and natural gas and the final legs of mail and package deliveries. The problem of sending any given amount of information across a channel can therefore be viewed in terms of sending Information-Carrying Energy ICE. For this reason, the concept of a pipe or conduit is relevant for examining existing systems.

conduits that carry small amounts of a resource a short distance to physically separated endpoints

Cost and Efficiency the high-capacity conduits in these systems tend to also have in common the ability to efficiently transfer a resource over a long distance. Only a small fraction of the resource being transferred is wasted or misdirected. The same cannot be said of lower-capacity conduits; this has to do with efficiency of scale. Conduits that are located closer to the end-user, do not have as many users supporting them; resources supporting these smaller conduits come from the local area. Resources for these conduits can be optimized to achieve the best solutions, however, lower operating efficiencies and greater installation expenses can cause these smaller conduits to be the most expensive and difficult part of a distribution system.

economies of scale increases of a conduit’s capacity are less expensive as the capacity increases

The economics of information transfer an effective last-mile conduit must:

Deliver signal power, must have adequate signal power capacity;

Experience low occurrence of conversion to unusable energy forms;

Support wide transmission bandwidth;

Deliver high signal-to-noise ratio, low unwanted-signal power;

Provide nomadic connectivity.

In addition, a good solution to the last-mile problem must provide each user high availability, reliability, low latency and high per-user capacity. A conduit which is shared among multiple end-users should provide a correspondingly higher capacity in order to properly support each individual user for information transfer in each direction.

Optical fiber offers high information capacity and is the medium of choice for scalability given the increasing bandwidth requirements of modern applications. Unlike copper-based and wireless last-mile mediums, it has built-in future capacity through upgrades of end-point optics and electronics without having to change the existing fiber infrastructure. 

optical fiber is the future of local and regional commerce

Efficiency · hub and spoke transport · intercity transit · Last Mile · Logistics · microtransit · Mobility · mobility network · public transit · Transit Calculator · Travel Plan Fees

Congestion Pricing in Transport

a pricing strategy that regulates demand without increasing the supply

Congestion pricing entails surcharging users in excess demand situations for public transport, electricity, data and communications and road pricing to reduce traffic congestion. The policy objective is to leverage cost to make users sensitive when consuming during peak demand and pay for additional congestion, encouraging demand redistribution.

Implementation have reduced congestion in urban environments; however, critics point out that the system is not equitable even as many economists believe in the effectiveness of road pricing in some form. Four types are in use:

a cordon around downtown areas;

area wide congestion pricing;

city center toll ring, and

congestion pricing, where access to a location is priced.

Economic rationale at zero cost, demand exceeds supply, causing shortages corrected with equilibrium prices instead of increasing supply; this entails price increases when and where congestion occurs.

congestion pricing is one demand side efficiency strategy

A quantity supplied is less than the quantity demanded at what is essentially a price of zero. If a service is provided free of charge, people tend to demand more and waste it instead of paying the price that reflected its cost. Congestion pricing charges help allocate resources to their most valuable uses.

Road congestion pricing is found almost exclusively in urban areas and city centers whereas cordon area pricing is a fee paid by users to enter a restricted area. Its effectiveness has improved with technological advances in toll collection.

Cities that have implemented congestion pricing schemes show traffic volume reductions from 10% to 30% as well as reduced air pollution. In some locations, net earnings are invested to promote mobility management, reduce air pollution, initiate pedestrian and cycling strategies as well as upgrade public transportation.

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destination management · hub and spoke transport · intercity transit · Logistics · microtransit · Mobility · mobility network · private transport · public transit · Transit Calculator · travel plan · Travel Plan Fees

First and Last Mile Solutions in Intercity and Local Transit

supply-chain management transport hubs and mobility networks

First and Last Miles are terms used in supply chain management and transport planning to define the movements of passengers and cargo from a transit hub to final-destination.

Supply-chain management includes managing the movement of raw materials, the internal processing of materials into finished goods, and the movement toward the end consumer. Businesses ownership of raw materials sources and distribution channels are increasingly being outsourced to other firms that can perform these activities more efficiently, hence an increase in customer demand services and a reduced control of logistics operations. An increase in supply-chain partners results in enhanced supply-chain management, inventory visibility and speed of movement.

Transport planning defines policies, goals, investments and designs for future needs to move people and goods to destinations; a collaborative process that incorporates the input of government agencies, the public and businesses. Planners apply a multi-modal approach to evaluate alternatives and impacts on the transportation system to influence beneficial outcomes.  

Transport hubs is where passengers and cargo are exchanged between carriers and modes of transport. Public hubs include train and metro stations, bus stops, airports and ferry docks. Freight hubs include rail yards, air cargo and truck terminals and ports. Delta Air Lines pioneered the passenger hub and spoke system in 1955 and FedEx adopted the model for overnight package delivery during the 1970s.

City streets that function as transit hubs, also known as transit malls, feature public transport, bike and walking lanes, taxi and ride-hailing services; regular car traffic is reduced or banned entirely.s

hub and spoke transport is cheaper than through services

Last mile also describes the difficulty in getting people from railway stations, bus depots, and ferry slips to their final-destination. Conversely, difficulty in getting from the starting location to a transport network is referred to as the first mile problem. Land-use patterns have moved more jobs and people to lower-density suburbs not within walking distance to public transit, hence promoting reliance on the private automobile.

Solutions to first and last mile problems have included feeder buses and, more recently car-sharing, ride-hailing and bicycle sharing systems as well as micro-mobility services such as dockless electric scooters and electric-assist bike sharing.

Mobility Networks are community based informal entities designed to deliver services across the spectrum of transit modes and providers, including public transit, private operators, planners and stakeholders to benefit local and regional customers.

 A Mobility Management Network is comprised of members tasked with the integration of available and planned mobility options to increase the capacity of transport systems.

Coordinated Transportation services for commuters, older adults, people with disabilities and lower incomes individuals. Changes in demographics, shifts in land use patterns, and the creation of new and different job markets require new approaches for providing transportation services, particularly for customers with special needs.

Mobility Management Specializes in Individual Customers

Projects that focus on short-range planning, training, and managing activities that improve coordination among public transportation and other service providers as well as increase service options that would not otherwise be available for seniors and individuals with disabilities.

Affiliated Networks are representative of the primary interests of the participants which include public and private transit providers and human service transportation providers that focus on rural transit, seniors and persons with disabilities.

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Cultural Heritage · destination management · Geography · Historic Towns · intercity transit · Rivers · Transit Calculator · Travel · travel plan · waterways

Lafayette Louisiana

history geography local culture and transport services

History the Attakapas Native Americans inhabited this area when French colonists founded the first European settlement, Petit Manchac, a trading post. In the late eighteenth century, numerous Acadian refugees settled here after being expelled from Canada; intermarriage led to the Cajun culture which fostered the French language and the Catholic religion. Vermilionville was renamed in 1884 for General Lafayette, the French aristocrat who aided the Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War. The city and parish economy continued to be based on agriculture into the early 20th century. In the 1940s, after oil was discovered in the parish, oil and natural gas became dominant.

downtown lafayette, louisianaLafayette lies along the Vermilion River in southwestern Louisiana and is nicknamed The Hub City

Geography Lafayette is located on the Western rim of the Atchafalaya Basin, the largest wetland and swamp in the United States where, during the Quaternary Period, the Mississippi River cut a 325-foot-deep (99 m) valley between what is now Lafayette and Baton Rouge. The southwestern Louisiana Prairie Terrace does not suffer significant flooding, outside of local flash flooding.

hilliard art museumLocal Cultural Organizations include the Acadiana Symphony Orchestra and Conservatory of Music, Chorale Acadienne, Lafayette Ballet Theatre and Dance Conservatory, The Lafayette Concert Band, and Performing Arts Society of Acadiana; as well as the Paul and Lulu Hilliard University Art Museum and the Acadiana Center for the Arts.

Lafayette is the Center of Acadiana Louisiana’s Cajun and Creole Culture

Transport Lafayette Regional Airport (LFT) is located on the southeast side of the city with daily scheduled passenger airline services to Houston, Dallas/Fort Worth, Denver, and Atlanta. Charter services depart Lafayette Regional as well as helicopter services and cargo jets.

cajun domeAmtrak’s Sunset Limited offers service three days a week from New Orleans and Los Angeles with selected stops in Louisiana, Texas, New Mexico, Arizona and California. Intercity passenger bus service is via Greyhound that operates a Station Downtown and Lafayette Transit System provides bus service within Lafayette City Limits.

The Lafayette MPO Bicycle Subcommittee has developed long-term goals for bicycling and Bike Lafayette, the local bicycle advocacy organization, actively promotes bicycle awareness, safety, and education in Acadiana. TRAIL promotes bicycling, canoeing, and pedestrian activities.

vermilion riverConnect for Your Travel to Lafayette and Louisiana

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