Business · Conservation · Cultural Heritage · Efficiency · entrepreneurs · eServices · Geography · Historic Towns · intercity transit · Logistics · microtransit · Mobility · museums · Rivers · Sustainable Communities · water quality · waterways

Geography Community and Climate Change

Thesis Increased urbanization and mass migrations over the last century are key to understanding human factors in climate change; these are best understood by a careful reading of history and geography in your community. Regions of the Earth that are successfully addressing environmental problems should assist other communities, regardless of their location, set an example and provide knowledge and expertise.

Geography as defined by Halford Mackinder, bridges the gap between arts and science; it connects history and culture with the environment. Mankind and not nature initiates activities but nature in large measure controls –Fernand Braudel. Those working in harmony with environmental influences will triumph over those who strive against them – WH Parker. Human nature is motivated by fear, self-interest and honor – Thucydides.

wilkes-barre ViewSustainable Communities are created by addressing resource protection climate change air and water quality human health and well-being

My Community the Washington DC, Potomac River and Middle Atlantic Region of the United States is characterized by a highly educated and knowledgeable citizenry that is very sensitive to environmental issues and is engaged locally and regionally.

Key Issues Affecting Climate Change

Chesapeake watershedurbanization, traffic gridlock, population increases, community migrations

agricultural runoffs from rivers and tributaries into

farming in the outlying Chesapeake region and urban area water quality issues have led to bacteria in the waters, resulting in swimming bans in the bay, rivers and the ocean

budget limitations have led to reduced inspection of watersheds, hence less maintenance and increases in storm water failures allowing tens of thousands of pounds of nutrients to enter the waterways

education there is still a disconnect between the scientific community and the public at large; climate issues are still not part of mainstream thinking and daily life even in socially and economically sophisticated communities.  

Local Solutions to Climate Change

Richmond Historic Canal WalkGovernments at all levels are engineering political solutions:

o   an agreement between EPA and Agricultural Organizations to implement pollution reduction programs aimed at restoring the Bay to health by 2025, and

o   local food production and consumption, a plastic bag tax, green roofs, bike and car sharing programs, light rail and other forms of public transport

Real success in mitigating climate change will be achieved when environmentally sound practices are adopted by local populations; in democratic societies, this can be achieved when small businesses and entrepreneurs join government, nonprofit and volunteer groups in this effort.

Issues are taken more seriously when your lively-hood depends on it. Hence, information, education and training lead to sustainable wealth creation.

Global Solutions to Climate Change

self reliant communities images by EffektAt the dawn of the 20th Century only 14 percent of the world’s population lived in cities; by 2025, 75 percent will be in urban settings. There are already 468 cities with over a million in population; 40 of these cities have more than 10 million residents.

These circumstances lead to continued economic, social, security, environment and climate problems. Increasingly there is a devolution from supranational and national to regional and local institutions to tackle these issues.

The more fortunate communities have an obligation to share their know-how, expertise and experience in climate change; it is in their interest to do so.

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Business · Conservation · Efficiency · eServices · Historic Towns · Logistics

District Energy Networks

community economic development safe and reliable energy livable towns and cities

District Energy provides and distributes locally generated thermal energy for heating and cooling homes, commercial and institutional buildings, and industrial processes. The system comprises two elements: a central energy plant containing equipment that produces thermal energy in the form of steam or hot water for heating, or chilled water for cooling as well as combined heat and power – CHP – units which produce electricity; a network of insulated pipes to distribute the thermal energy from the central plant to buildings that receive reliable, efficient, affordable, and clean thermal energy from locally controlled and highly efficient central plants.

biogas systemdistrict networks achieve economies of scale by meeting the energy demands of many buildings

High Efficiency and low cost are achieved by producing and distributing thermal energy at a local level. Higher efficiency leads to lower costs over the long term, especially with the utilization of local fuels.

Flexibility and resiliency the ability of district energy networks to take heat from multiple sources, fuels, and technologies makes it very flexible, giving communities more secure energy supplies.

Optimum Supplies new and emerging technologies like heat pumps, fuel cells, or biofuels are easily and rapidly retrofitted, without the need to install equipment in end user facilities.

Local Control ensures that investment decisions are made in the community.

Thermal Energy Services can be delivered through a variety of vehicles, including local municipalities, private sector entities and community-owned, nonprofit special purpose vehicles – SPVs – ensuring that surpluses are re-invested to extend the networks, insulate customer buildings or updating control systems.

Carbon Emissions efficiency is achieved with the utilization of fossil fuels and renewable fuels.

bioman plantdistrict energy offers a complementary infrastructure to gas and electricity networks

Fuel Sources include both fossils and renewables, such as natural gas, oil, coal, biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, and waste to energy that are able to capture and distribute surplus heat from industrial processes and power generation that would otherwise be wasted.  Heat networks aggregate the thermal demand of multiple buildings to a scale that enables the use of technologies with higher efficiencies, or ones that may not be economical to deploy at the individual building level, such as biomass, waste to energy, or combined heat and power cogeneration.

A CHP Plant offers significant benefits. Electrical and thermal energy achieve efficiencies of 75% as well as the flexibility of using different fuel types. Thermal storage during periods of peak demand for electricity can be stored and used later during peak thermal demand periods. Also, electric boilers can be utilized to balance periods of over and underproduction of electricity and provide secure thermal energy and power services to the local area reducing stress caused by grid congestion, transmission and distribution losses while improving overall efficiency and energy security.

Local lower cost, less polluting and secure energy are the premises for diverse communities that provide residential, civic, retail, cultural, and entertainment facilities, within walking distance and with efficient public transit; these are the economic multipliers that create new business opportunities and jobs.

self reliant communities images by EffektLearn More about District Energy Networks for Your Community

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Cultural Heritage · eServices · Historic Towns · Italy · Logistics · Mobility · museums · Travel

Trapani Marsala and Western Sicily Food and Wine Traditions

Trapani is near ancient Drepanum where a naval battle took place in 248 BC during the First Punic War between Carthage and Rome which ended in a major loss for the latter. The city is world renowned since the 16th Century for its coral artisans whose works can be viewed at the Pepoli Museum. A stroll through the historic center will acquaint the visitor with buildings and monuments representative of the various cultures and traditions that passed through this city:

Trapani view from ericeThe Jewish quarter and Palazzo della Giudecca;

Casalicchio and its Arab roots;

Palazzo Cavarretta, home of the Trapanese Senate;

The Jesuit Church and College;

San Lorenzo Cathedral and the Crucifix by Flemish painter Van Dyck.

papazzo della giudeccaWestern Sicily is also the Erice Medieval Borgo, Segesta with its Greek temple and theater and the Egadi archipelago, comprised of Favignana, Levanzo and Marettimo. Further along the coast, facing Africa, are: the port and canal of Mazara del Vallo; Selinunte with Europe’s largest archeological park; San Vito Lo Capo and the Scopello Faraglioni.

Western Sicily Italy mapMarsala was founded in 397 BC as Lillibeo by the Phoenicians who survived the destruction of Mozia; it was a major city during the Punic, Roman, Arab and Norman periods. Today, it is best known for a prestigious wine-liqueur that carries the city’s name and the landing of Garibaldi’s Mille in 1860 which led to the unification of Italy.

Ancient Marsala’s origins are reflected in its majestic cathedral, the adjacent 16th Century Arazzi Fiamminghi museum, the suggestive Porta Garibaldi sea view and entry to the Spanish quarter. Artistic and cultural itineraries include: the Sibilla Grotto, the archeological museum with the remains of a Carthaginian ship and Lilibeo artifacts and the Laguna dello Stagnone with its windmills and salt marshes.

CathedralExperiential Tourism in Trapani Marsala and Western Sicily

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Marsala WineMarsala wine’s bouquet full of intense aromas of dried fruit, spices and dates and dried figs, the dry and sweet taste and the high alcoholic qualities that increase to depending on the maturation and refinement in the bottle. Dried Marsala, served fresh, is an excellent aperitif. A delicious combination is with strong, spicy and tasty cheeses such as ragusano, pecorino cheese but also gorgonzola or parmesan. It is an exceptional dessert wine, in harmony with the traditional Sicilian pastries. But the combination with food is not essential; Marsala is also a wonderful meditation wine to sip at sunset.

cassata sicilianaSicilian cuisine is like the island’s colorful architecture; extraordinary dishes rich in decorations and styles influenced by the many cultures that have come here. Marsala is a jealous custodian of the many culinary traditions on the island. Some typical dishes: Mussel Soup, Peppered Mussels, Boiled Broad Beans, Aubergine Parmigiana, Eggplant Caponata, Eggplant with Schnitzel, Stuffed Peppers, Crushed Olives, Baked Pasta, Pasta with “Qualeddu” and Sausage, Pasta with Bottarga, Pasta with sardines, Pasta with sea urchins, Gnoccoli with conger sauce, Busiata with matarocco, Pasta with lobster, Tuna ammuttunatu, Sarde with “beccaficu”, Marinated mackerel, Codfish, swordfish with salmoriglio, Trigliole e Cuttlefish of Stagnone, Scaloppine with Marsala, Lamb or goat stew, Sicilian Cassata, Cannoli, Sfinci, Sfincioni of San Giuseppe with ricotta, Cappdduzzi of ricotta, Pignolata, “Mustazzoli of honey or cooked wine, Cassateddi of fig, Cubbaita, Cuccia, Marturana fruit, Queen biscuits, Taralli and Tagliancozzo.

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America · Atlantic Coast · Historic Towns · Logistics · Maritime · Maritime Heritage · museums · Travel

Palm Beach Florida and the Maritime Museum

The Town of Palm Beach is the easternmost town in Florida, located on an 18-mile (29 km) long barrier island between Lake Worth Lagoon on the west and the Atlantic Ocean on the east. At no point is the island wider than three-quarters of a mile (1.2 km), and in places it is only 500 feet (150 m). The Intracoastal Waterway separates it from the neighboring West Palm Beach and Lake Worth.

Palm Beach ViewIn 2018 Palm Beach was ranked the 27th wealthiest place in the United States

The wreck of the Providencia is credited with giving Palm Beach its famous name. The Providencia was traveling from Havana to Spain with a cargo of coconuts harvested in Trinidad, when the ship wrecked near Palm Beach. Many of the coconut were planted along the coast and a grove of palm trees soon grew on what was later named Palm Beach. Today the tallest coconut palms in the United States can be found along this coast.

The Lake Worth portion of the waterway, filled with mega-yachts, was a fresh water lake until Henry Flagler opened it to the ocean. Flagler was the railroad tycoon who opened Florida all the way to the Keys and his Lake Worth mansion, now a museum, is open for tours.

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The Palm Beach Maritime Museum opened in 1999 with four facilities, following a lengthy restoration and construction program:

Palm Beach Coast Guard Stationthe U.S. Coast Guard Station Boathouse and President Kennedy command post and bomb shelter on Peanut Island;

the marine science field office and dock on the Intracoastal Waterway;

an educational center and ferry dock at Currie Park in West Palm Beach;

the Palm Beach Maritime Academy K-8 Charter School on S. Dixie Hwy. in West Palm Beach.

PB MaritimeJohn F. Kennedy’s Bunker was constructed by the SeaBees under the direction of the Secret Service. Peanut Island is very near the Kennedy Compound in Palm Beach and the bunker was a nuclear war contingency facility during the Cuban Missile Crisis.

An innovative Virtual Port includes automated data collection from in situ sensors – salinity, turbidity, pH, tides, current – as well as real-time television both above and underwater.

The Palm Beach Maritime Academy is a Charter School, operated by the Palm Beach Maritime Museum that meets the guidelines for the School District of Palm Beach County, with a focus on maritime studies: science, technology and history.

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Savannah Georgia and the Ships of the Sea Maritime Museum

Savannah was founded in 1733 on the Savannah River, it became the colonial capital and later the first state capital of Georgia. Its port was of strategic importance during both the American Revolution and the Civil War.

Location Savannah lies on the Savannah River, approximately 20 miles -32 km – upriver from the Atlantic Ocean. It is also located near the Intracoastal Waterway. The Ogeechee River flows toward the Atlantic Ocean some 16 miles – 26 km – south of downtown Savannah.

Savannah DowntownDiverse Neighborhoods over 100 distinct neighborhoods can be identified in six principal areas of Savannah. The city’s location offers visitors access to the coastal islands and the Savannah Riverfront, both popular tourist destinations. Other picturesque towns adjacent to Savannah include the shrimping village of Thunderbolt and three residential areas that began as summer resort communities: Beaulieu, Vernonburg, and the Isle of Hope.

The Savannah Historic District is one of largest in the United States

Culture Savannah has a rich and growing performing arts scene, offering cultural events throughout the year, including the Savannah Book Festival held annually on Presidents’ Day weekend in the vicinity of historic Telfair and Wright squares, includes free presentations by more than 35 contemporary authors.

Savannah historic districtArchitecture Savannah was named as America’s second-best city for Cool Buildings and Architecture, behind Chicago. The historic district has 22 squares that vary in size and character, from formal fountain and monuments to playgrounds.

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Scarbrough House is the elegant setting for the Museum’s collection of ship models, paintings, and maritime antiques. It was built in 1819 for one of the principal owners of the Savannah, the first steamship to cross the Atlantic Ocean. The architect, William Jay from Bath, England, created one of the earliest examples of domestic Greek Revival architecture in the South. Ships of the Sea Maritime Museum restored the house in 1996-97.

Images for Ships of the Sea MuseumWilliam Scarbrough was a shipping merchant, born in North Carolina and educated at the University of Edinburgh, who came to Savannah in 1802, at the age of twenty-six.  In 1818, he became a principal investor and president of the Savannah Steamship Company and began construction of a new house – later called the Castle – on West Broad Street in one of Savannah’s most fashionable neighborhoods.

Ships of the Sea Maritime Museum Educational Programs

Women Pirates like Rachel Wall, Grace O’Malley and Madame Cheng are featured in an interactive program about the exciting role female pirates played in maritime history.

Scrimshaws are decorative carvings on walrus tusks, whale teeth or other bits of bone.  Following the traditions of the great scrims handers, you can learn to make your own piece of carved art.

ships of the sea exhibitSailor Valentines it was customary for sailors to give gifts.  A popular offering was the Sailor’s Valentine or Shell Mosaic.  Sailors would create these items with shells, beans, cloth, and other pieces of scrap material they found on board or gathered from various ports.

Girl Scouts Troop Tours Juliette Gordon Low had family connections to the historic steamship Savannah and her cousin was a Confederate pirate. A WWII vessel was named after her.

Savannah’s role during the Civil War at Sea.  Topics include, the Union’s blockade of the city, blockade runners, and the lives of sailors in the Union and Confederate Navies, as well as important Naval operations in the Savannah area.

USS Savannah and her storied history of service in the United States Navy, from 1933-1946, on the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, from operation Torch to operation Magic Carpet.

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America · Atlantic Coast · Cultural Heritage · Historic Towns · intercity transit · Logistics · Maritime · Maritime Heritage · Mobility · museums · Rivers · Travel · travel plan

The Delaware River Waterfront and Philadelphia Maritime Museums

The Delaware River Valley is the metropolitan area centered on the city of Philadelphia, the region’s major commercial, cultural, and industrial center. The region’s excellent road and rail network make it the perfect location for a vacation or business trip to the Middle Atlantic States. Philadelphia International is a major airline hub with daily connections to North American destinations and from major European cities.

Phila ViewThe River and the Environment

The Delaware River is comprised of 36 tributaries and flows 330 miles from New York to Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Delaware to the Atlantic Ocean. It extends from the Catskill and Pocono mountain springs and streams flowing down to the Delaware Water Gap where steep slopes give way to gently rolling hills and sweeping valleys. Then, it stretches 134 miles from the Trenton falls to the mouth of the Delaware Bay.   

Blackbeard and the Golden Age of PiracyDelaware County and River Towns Marcus Hook’s historical significance comes from its identity as a maritime town. Originally a Lenape settlement, it became a New Sweden trading post in the 1640s with shipbuilding and fishing as early industries. The Hook was also a haven for pirates in the early 18th century and its market provided a place to sell plundered goods and re-supply for their next voyage.

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The Philadelphia Ship Preservation Guild maintains and sails historic ships to bring the past to the present. A non-profit organization that teaches and practices seamanship, traditional restoration, maritime culture, and sailing skills in a fun and team focused setting.

crtsy-drwc-spruce-street-harbor-park-aerial-popped-550VPThe Independence Seaport Museum features the Schooner Diligence, designed and built by Joshua and Samuel Humphreys in Philadelphia in 1797 for the Revenue-Marine and later transferred to the Navy. Schooners like Diligence played a vital role in the development of the early Navy in defending American merchant ships from attacks by Britain, France and the Barbary pirates.

The original Diligence served in the West Indies Squadron under John Barry, who commanded the Frigate United States during the Quasi War with France in 1798-1800.

The Cruiser Olympia was launched in 1892 and is the oldest steel warship afloat in the world. It has some the first modern luxuries aboard warships, including refrigeration, a fresh water distiller, steam radiators for heat, electric lighting, and a blower-operated ventilation system. Olympia required a new breed of sailor specifically trained in steam-driven and electrically-powered technology.

Washington PierPier 68 is a place to relax and enjoy the Philadelphia waterfront where you can learn about the tidal ecology of the Delaware River, its watershed, or engage in recreational fishing. Design elements include:

An Entrance Deck with whimsical painted poles and repurposed maritime bollards to create a distinctive gateway for the pier. Located just off the future trail extension, this space serves as a resting spot for those using the trail and as a place where shopping center visitors can quickly experience the Pier Park.

ferry-and-bridgeCruise the Delaware River north or south from Philadelphia and make your way to Chesapeake Bay by way of the C&D Canal or take the Ferry to Camden to visit local attractions like the battleship New Jersey.

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America · Atlantic Coast · Cultural Heritage · eServices · Historic Towns · Logistics · Maritime · Maritime Heritage · Mobility · museums · Rivers · Travel

Tuckerton Borough Seaport New Jersey and the Bay Men Museum

Tuckerton Borough and Ocean County nestled in Southern Ocean County between the Pine Barrens and the Bay, Tuckerton Borough was once a thriving seaport community. Ocean County is home to one-third of the Jersey Shore’s 44 miles of the Atlantic Ocean coastline with sandy beaches, surfing, fishing and water sports.

Barnegat LighthouseNew Jersey’s first summer resort was on Tucker’s Island off shore from Little Egg Harbor. The island sported boarding houses, private cottages, and a school. In 1848 a Lighthouse was erected there and in 1869 the Little Egg Harbor Lifesaving Station was constructed.

The Tuckerton Seaport preserves and interprets the rich maritime history, artistry, heritage and environment of the Jersey shore and the unique contributions of its bay men. An educational and interpretive center showcasing New Jersey’s rich maritime history and contemporary folklife through interpretation of the cultural heritage and environment of the New Jersey shore and the surrounding environment.

Tuckerton boroughThe Maritime Village is a 40-acre site with 17 historic and recreated buildings connected by a boardwalk, a maritime forest and wetlands nature trail, two houseboats, a decoy gallery, a working boat works building in which restoration of sneak-box designs – boats used by duck hunters and recreational boating – of the Barnegat Bay occurs, a historic marine railway, decoy carving workshops and the recreated Tucker’s Island Lighthouse.

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Explore exhibits and meet the people who lived, worked and played along the Barnegat Bay:  decoy carvers, boat builders, basket makers, quilters, commercial fishermen, artists and other bay men and women.  General programs offered include hands on activities, workshops, tours and classes taught by Jersey Shore artists.

The Tucker’s Island Lighthouse features exhibits on privateers and pirates of the Jersey Coast

JcnerrThe Jersey Shore Folklife Center JSFC researches, documents, supports and presents the diverse communities and traditions of the Jersey Shore and the Pinelands.  The Center presents folk art programs and exhibits at Tuckerton Seaport and manages the artist roster and guest demonstrator schedule, the Folk and Traditional Artist in Residence Program, the Jersey Traditions outreach program and changing artist exhibits in J.C. Parker’s Decoy workshop.  JSFC celebrates the profoundly creative spirit of the region, its traditional arts, and its occupational and recreational folklife.

The Jacques Cousteau National Estuarine Research Reserve Interpretive Center JCNERR is managed by the Institute of Marine and Coastal Sciences of Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey. The Reserve encompasses habitat in and around the estuary where fresh water from the Mullica River and saltwater from the Atlantic Ocean mix in the Great Bay.

batsto mansionBatsto Village is a New Jersey historic site located in the South-Central Pinelands whose roots can be traced back to 1766. Two centuries of American history are available to visitors, with the Pinelands environment as a scenic backdrop.

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