Conservation · Efficiency · Lakes · Rivers · Sustainable Communities · water quality · waterways

Water Supply Planning

Water Consumption comes from a lake, reservoir, river or a groundwater aquifer via wells. Individually, we consume 80 to 100 gallons per day and the typical household 400/day. A Community Growth Management Plan determines the quantity of water that can be safely withdrawn from all sources under drought conditions; the available supply must then be compared with current demand as well as that with anticipated growth. If demand comes too close to supply, then the plan must recommend actions to offset a shortage.

Excessive Withdrawal Prevention is established with safe and/or sustainable yields of an aquifer’s water balance analysis. First, you calculate the amount of precipitation replenishing the water source during drought periods. Precipitation supplies are then subtracted from freshwater flowing into wetlands, streams and waterways that keep these aquatic resources healthy. Thereafter, all uses are accounted for: irrigation, industrial processing, cooling, hydroelectric and other.  The balance is the amount of water that can be safely and sustainably withdrawn. 

Water Consumption Growth is Limited to the Remaining Amount

Climate Change may have a substantial effect on future water supplies; studies indicate that the combined effect of decline in precipitation, and increased temperatures, may cause a 35 percent reduction in the amount of water entering rivers by the year 2040. 

FAQs does your growth management plan include:

criteria for assessing water supply adequacy

current drought-period water supply and demand

how water supply and demand will change with anticipated growth

actions for resolving water supply deficiencies and the factual basis for the effectiveness of each action

how shortfalls will be resolved with anticipated growth.

A New Plan for Your Area if your current plan is about to expire or rates poorly based on the Quality of Life Growth Management system, we can assist you in carrying out the outlined steps and/or conduct a community workshop and assist you in formulating a planning strategy for your community.

Tell us about Your Water Supply Plan

Atlantic Coast · canals · Cultural Heritage · cultural itineraries · destination management · food and wine itineraries · Friends and Family Travel · Historic District · Historic Towns · intercity transit · Lakes · museums · Rivers · Travel · travel plan · waterways · Wine Trails

Environmental and Historical Tourism

Food Wine and Craft Beer Trails in US North East Towns

The Northeast Region of the United States corresponds to the original northern colonies that founded the country. Besides its illustrious history and culture, the region is a trend setter on the technological and environmental fronts along with agricultural innovations and unique, local food, wine and craft beer traditions.

Vermont is agriculture and industry, heritage museums and historic sites, small towns and downtowns where visitors and residents find the distinctive local businesses, historic buildings, and rich cultural and social activities that form Vermont’s special sense of community. These authentic and attractive downtowns and villages are widely recognized as a key part of the state’s allure.

Rockland and Piermont are located just 30 miles north of New York City and are known for quaint villages, spectacular river views and outdoor recreation with 32,000 acres of park lands dotted with sparkling lakes and streams rushing down to the Hudson. Miles marked trails lead right to the foothills of the Ramapo Mountains. The Hudson Valley extends 150 miles above the tip of Manhattan; a National Heritage Area the valley is steeped in history natural beauty culture food and farmers’ markets.

Upstate New York is home to city and country settings, high-tech industries and natural wonders. Drive through the Catskill Mountains and reach the Corning Museum, the world’s largest glass museum featuring a contemporary art and design wing; experience live hot glass demonstrations of glass objects made by artists and hands-on exhibits highlighting science and technology.

The Finger Lakes and Watkins Glen State Park, site of 19 waterfalls and a gorge. Seneca Lake is a long slender lake with wineries along both sides. From Geneva, on the north shore of the lake, you can head east towards Syracuse and visit Destiny USA, sixth largest shopping destination in the United States.

Rochester is a world-renowned American city and home to George Eastman House International Museum of Photography and Film inside the home of Kodak’s founder.

Cruise or Walk though Historic Villages along the Erie Canal

North East Atlantic Travel Destination Services

Travel Plans     Intercity & Local Transport

Environmental Tourism

Some communities have been in the forefront of land conservation, historic preservation and arts movements that celebrate the land, landscapes and water resources management initiatives. 

Local Culture in the Lehigh Valley draws from the Moravian settlements experience, a broad cultural environment in which music, art, education and religious tolerance flourished, as evidenced by the communal dwellings, churches and industrial structures.

The Brandywine Valley facing an industrial development that would impact a largely rural community, focused on Development & Conservancy Issues, including floodplain areas that threatened to devastate water supplies in parts of the Delaware River Valley. 

In Philadelphia the waterfront is now a 6-mile walking and biking destination. Trail features include streetscape improvements, a bi-directional bikeway, pedestrian walkway and rain gardens that collect the first inch of storm water, relieving the city sewer system during major weather events, along with benches, bike racks, decorative street pavers and innovative solar trail lighting.

Center City offers a thriving culture and entertainment scene as well as a contemporary arts museum with training programs and study tours for students, aspiring artists and traveling families.  

Historical Tourism

Bucks County is one of the three original counties created by William Penn in 1682. Pennsbury Manor stands on the point of land formed by the Delaware River between Morrisville and Bristol. Painstaking research went into restoring the prim-fronted, three-storied, brick manor-house, rebuilt on the original foundations.

Lehigh Valley Allentown was a rural village founded in 1762 by William Allen, Chief Justice of Colonial Pennsylvania’s Supreme Court. By 1829 Allentown expanded from a small Pennsylvania Dutch village of farmers and tradesmen to a center of commerce. With the opening of the Lehigh Canal, many canal workers made their homes here. 

The Lehigh Valley Gave Birth to America’s Industrial Revolution

Loudoun County Virginia is renowned for rolling hills of farms and vineyards, pastures filled with grazing horses, and the Blue Ridge Mountains; it is also just 25 miles from Washington DC.

Leesburg has seen significant history from 1758 and has a well-preserved downtown historic district with stunning 18th and 19th century architecture. It also a shopping and dining venue and features historic sites such as Gen. George C. Marshall’s home, Dodona Manor and Ball’s Bluff Civil War battlefield.

Middleburg, known as the capital of Virginia’s horse country, has been welcoming visitors since 1787. It is also a shopper’s delight, with home furnishing and antique stores, boutiques and more; a stroll through this historic hamlet is a unique experience. Middleburg has hosted iconic American personalities such as Jackie Kennedy and F. Scott Fitzgerald.

  history geology hydrology fishing and the environment

The Eastern Shore of Maryland is comprised of nine counties with a population of nearly 450 thousand. The term Eastern Shore distinguishes a territorial part of the State from the land west of Chesapeake Bay. The Chesapeake and Delaware Canal was a shallow canal with locks after its construction in 1829; it was deepened in the early 20th century to sea level. The north-south section of the Mason-Dixon Line forms the border between Maryland and Delaware.

Environmental and Historical Tourism in the US North East

Conservation · Cultural Heritage · cultural itineraries · destination management · food and wine itineraries · Historic Towns · intercity transit · museums · Rivers · Sustainable Communities · Tradition · travel plan · water quality · waterways · Wine Trails

Chester County Pennsylvania

American Historic Small-Town Itineraries

Chester County William Penn established Chester County in 1682 as one of the first three counties in Pennsylvania; West Chester is the county seat. Other historic towns in Chester County include Kennett Square, Oxford and Phoenixville. Each has its own unique agricultural, revolutionary and industrial histories. These Main Streets of the Brandywine Valley are treasures of a time gone by with lovely tree-lined streets filled with restaurants, shops, galleries, markets, festivals and more. 

West Chester nestled in the heart of the Brandywine Valley, West Chester is a picturesque and historic community that offers small-town charm with a cosmopolitan flair. Their downtown boasts 83 shops and 59 restaurants. The Chester County Historical Society is a history museum which tells the American story from a local perspective. West Chester’s Main Streets offer a host of diverse shops and galleries. Specialty shops featuring imported olive oils, fine handmade chocolates, cigars and skate and surf equipment. The West Chester railroad, one of the oldest in America, offers a 90-minute train excursion through the beautiful Chester Creek Valley.

Kennett Square the town was originally called Kennet Square, with the name “Kennet”, England, and “Square” coming from the original William Penn one square mile land grant. General Sir William Howe marched through Kennett to the Battle of Brandywine during the American Revolution. Kennett is famous for being the mushroom capital of the world; over 60 percent of the nation’s mushroom crop is from this region. This small-town main street is filled with an eco-boutique, a rare book store, quilts, antiques and a spa. A walk down Kennett’s State Street is also a culinary adventure.

Oxford on the way stop to view the historic covered bridges that surround the countryside. Then, stroll down Oxford’s Main Street where Amish buggy’s share the road, a vibrant art alliance hosts exhibits, shows and events, farmers markets offer local foods and wares, and charming coffee and tea shops.

Reduce Transit Times and Travel Cost on Your Next Trip

Travel Plans     Intercity & Local Transport

Phoenixville like many American towns and cities, Phoenixville owes its growth to its waterways. The Phoenix Company Foundry, built in 1882, is home to the Schuylkill River Heritage Center, a historic gateway to northern Chester County that provides information about places of interest to visit throughout the region. Originally called Manavon, Phoenixville was settled in 1732. In its industrial heyday early in the twentieth century, it was an important manufacturing center and it was the site of great iron and steel mills, boiler works, silk mill, underwear and hosiery factories, a match factory, and Etruscan majolica pottery. The Iron Hill Brewery is a great gathering spot on Bridge Street, Phoenixville’s main drag; it specializes in handcrafted beer and creative cuisine. Charming shops line the main street.

The Brandywine Valley wind your way along the banks of the Brandywine River through horse country and rich farmland. The rolling hills and verdant pastures along the Brandywine Valley Byway form a lovely and dramatic backdrop including Longwood Gardens, a stunning horticultural display set on the more than 1,000 aces of the former du Pont estate and the Brandywine River Museum, housed in a 19thcentury gristmill. Its unparalleled collection of works by three generations of Wyeth’s American illustration, still-life, and landscape paintings make it a mecca for art lovers from all over the world.

Brandywine Valley Wine Trails beautiful estate vineyards in the rolling hills of Chester County, charming tasting rooms and barrel-aging cellars filled with premium wines that showcase a unique terroir. Spanning scenic southeastern Pennsylvania between historic Philadelphia and the Amish countryside outside Lancaster, the four wineries of the Brandywine Valley Wine Trail are located within an easy drive of one another and are open year-round. Pennsylvania’s climate and terrain provide some of the best growing conditions on the east coast, allowing Brandywine Valley to be one of the state’s premier wine regions. Brandywine Valley’s bucolic countryside is home to many fine wineries. Make a stop at Chadds Ford Winery, the largest wine producer in the state or visit any of the unique, family farmed wineries along the Brandywine Artisan Wine Trail.

Historic Small-Town Travel Experiences in Chester County

Business · Cultural Heritage · cultural itineraries · destination management · food and wine itineraries · Historic Towns · intercity transit · museums · Rivers · travel plan

Fort Worth Texas Cowboys Cowgirls and Culture

Cultural Heritage Museums Water Resources and the Environment Local Food Wine and Beer Public Transport Initiatives

Originally settled in 1849 as an army outpost along the Trinity River, Fort Worth was one of eight forts assigned to protect settlers on the advancing frontier. The cattle industry was king for a generation of people working the Fort Worth leg of the historic Chisholm Trail, which ran from the 1860s to the 1870s when the Texas & Pacific Railway arrived. In the years that followed, oil and aviation brought new wealth throughout the region.

The post-war years found Fort Worth capitalizing on its strengths as a transport, business and military center. Cultural pursuits included the development of the city’s internationally acclaimed museum district. The mid-1980s saw the start of a major revitalization of that city’s downtown and the introduction of Sundance Square, a 35-block commercial, residential, entertainment and retail district. Fort Worth’s red brick buildings and its Western heritage live on as visitors can experience the Old West beautifully preserved through the Stockyards National Historic District.

Food Brews and Spirits experience cowboy cuisine, trendy farm-to-table, authentic Mexican and bayou fare. Highlights include beef briskets, pork ribs and locally grown, organic artisan cheeses, alongside nicely paired wines. Artisanal distilleries offer straight bourbon, premium blended whiskey and vodka made from black-eyed peas. Also handcrafted beers, some brewed with milk, honey and sugar, accompanied by live music and local food trucks.

The Outdoors the Trinity Trails extend through Fort Worth for over 40 miles along the Trinity River with amenities for hikers, bikers, runners, and horseback riders with connections to the Stockyards, Downtown, the Zoo and the Cultural District. The Fort Worth Nature Center and Refuge is a 3621-acre preserved natural area designated by the Department of the Interior as a National Natural Landmark Site in 1980. Established in 1964 as the Greer Island Nature Center, it has small, genetically pure bison herd, a resident prairie dog town, and the prairie upon which they live. It is one of the largest urban parks of its type in the United States.

Museums renowned for their architecture and the quality of their collections, the Cultural District is home to six museums; Fort Worth is also home to museums devoted to Western heritage and the city’s colorful past. 

The National Cowgirl Museum and Hall of Fame is dedicated to honoring trailblazing women of the American West. Its multimedia exhibits and historic photographs, papers, clothing, spurs and saddles tell the stories of women pioneers, ranchers, performers and rodeo stars.

Log Cabin Village 19th century Texas nestled on three acres and nine historic structures, Texas history is portrayed through authentic log homes, a blacksmith shop, a one-room schoolhouse, smokehouse, water-powered gristmill and herb garden. Experience frontier chores, including candle making, spinning and weaving.

The Modern Art Museum maintains one of the foremost collections of international modern and contemporary art in the United States with works by Andy Warhol, Jackson Pollock, and Mark Rothko are displayed in a concrete and glass building surrounded by a reflecting pond.

The Kimbell Art Museum is a permanent collection with major works by Fra Angelico, Velazquez, Bernini, Rembrandt, Goya, Monet, Cezanne, Picasso, Mondrian and Matisse. It is also home to Michelangelo’s first known painting. The collection comprises Asian and non-Western as well as European art as well as traveling exhibits on display throughout the year.

The American Airlines Museum is dedicated to commercial aviation and the world of flight. Exhibits include hundreds of historical artifacts, photographs, full-scale aircraft engines and a rare Douglas DC-3 airliner.

Reduce Transit Times and Travel Cost on Your Fort Worth Trip

Travel Plans     Intercity & Local Transport

Transportation it is easy to get around Fort Worth or travel to nearby and Dallas and Grapevine. 

Bus the T – Fort Worth Transport Authority – provides extensive service throughout the city and its cultural attractions.

Rail the TRE – Trinity Rail Express – connects Fort Worth and Dallas with transfer access to DFW International Airport.

Air DFW is only 17.5 miles from downtown Fort Worth via bus, rail or taxi service. From here, you can reach any major city in the U.S. in less than four hours.

Walking is a wonderful way to experience the city’ entertainment districts and the Trinity Trails.

Bike Sharing: Bike sharing is an inexpensive, healthy and environmentally friendly way to get around Fort Worth. Pick up a bike at any of the 40 docking stations.

Plan Your Fort Worth and Texas Business Trip or Vacation

Atlantic Coast · Conservation · Cultural Heritage · cultural itineraries · Historic Towns · intercity transit · museums · Resilience · Rivers · Sustainable Communities · Travel Plan Fees · water quality

Exploring Brandywine Creek and Valley

Brandywine Creek is a tributary of the Christina River in southeastern Pennsylvania and northern Delaware. The Lower Brandywine is 20.4 miles long and is a designated Pennsylvania Scenic River with several tributary streams.

Development and Conservancy Issues in the 1960s, Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania in the historic Brandywine Valley, faced a possible massive industrial development that would impact a largely rural community.  Also, development plans in floodplain areas threatened to devastate water supplies for numerous communities in southeastern Pennsylvania and northern Delaware.

Residents bought endangered land and founded the Brandywine Conservancy in 1967.  The first conservation easements, protecting more than five and one-half miles along the Brandywine, were granted in 1969. 

These Experiences have placed the Brandywine Valley communities in the forefront of responsible land use, open space preservation and water protection with a focus on integrating conservation with economic development through land stewardship and local government assistance programs working with individuals, state, county and municipal governments and private organizations to permanently protect and conserve natural, cultural and scenic resources.

The Conservancy opened a museum in 1971 in the renovated Hoffman’s Mill, a former gristmill built in 1864, part of the Conservancy’s first preservation efforts.  It contains an unparalleled collection of American art with emphasis on the art of the Brandywine region, illustration, still life and landscape painting, and the work of the Wyeth family.

River Museums Microbrews and Shopping in Delaware and Southeastern PA

Professional Enrichment Tours address suburban sprawl, declining water quality, diminishing water supplies, vanishing agricultural land, loss of historic character, wildlife habitat degradation, and threatened biological resources. Learn to:

·         Protect and conserve land and water, natural, cultural and scenic resources;

·         Create and strengthen local government efforts that support resource conservation;

·         Improve site planning and design to support resource conservation;

·         Plan and conserve of natural and cultural resources;

·         Enhance awareness and knowledge of conservation approaches.

Travel to the US Mid-Atlantic

Reduce Transit Times and Travel Cost on Your Next Trip

Travel Plans     Intercity & Local Transport

On the way to the Brandywine Valley, it is worth visiting three cultural venues in Wilmington:

Rockwood Mansion & Park, an English country estate featuring unique gardens, a Rural Gothic mansion with conservatory, and a Victorian house museum with 19thand 20th century furnishings.

The Delaware Center for the Contemporary Arts, located in the Wilmington Riverfront District, is a non-collecting contemporary art museum dedicated to the advancement of contemporary art. The DCCA houses seven galleries with over 30 exhibits annually, featuring the work of regional, national, and international artists.

The Delaware Art Museum founded in 1912, it offers vibrant family programs, studio art classes, a diverse collection of American art and illustration and an outdoor sculpture garden.

Explore Brandywine Valley, Delaware and Southeastern PA

Cultural Heritage · cultural itineraries · destination management · Historic Towns · museums · Rivers · Travel

Mid America Destinations

Illinois River Towns Quad Cities North Shore and South Dakota

Illinois and Iowa

Champaign County is nearly equidistant from Chicago, St Louis and Indianapolis; a thriving micro-urban oasis supported by local agriculture, technology and research and home to the University of Illinois. The College of Agriculture, Consumer and Environmental Science is a leader in crop science, bioenergy and animal science.

Farmer-owned Grain Cooperatives in America’s heartland and the Illinois grain belt; rich soils and modern farm practices produce record yields of quality grains. Ethanol and distiller’s grain production. Research in soybeans, from production to consumption, by the National Soybeans Research Laboratory. The National Center for Supercomputing Applications, whose Blue Waters Supercomputer is the largest and most powerful on a university campus and among the largest in the world.

The River Towns of Illinois along the banks and bluffs of the Mississippi River hug the western border of Illinois for 550 miles. Experience an Illinois winery, brewery, farm, u-pick, or local farm to table restaurant. Four Centuries of history and heritage and thousands of stories that recount America’s evolution while experiencing breathtaking views, majestic landscapes and species that travel thousands of miles for a visit or to make themselves a home.

The Quad Cities area consists of Davenport and Bettendorf in Iowa, and Moline, East Moline and Rock Island in Illinois. The region has the excitement of a big city and the hospitality of a small town with award-winning museums and cultural centers, internationally-recognized festivals, beautiful riverfronts and a vibrant nightlife.

Davenport has beautiful riverfront vistas and an active downtown area with the Figge Art and Putnam History Museums and great shopping at the North Park Mall.

Bettendorf the Library and adjacent Family Museum provide exciting programs and storytelling. The numerous outdoor activities include the Splash Landing water park, Wallace’s Garden Center and Duck Creek Recreational Trail.

Rock Island downtown is known for its festivals and nightlife with Cajun food and zydeco music; Jamaican food and reggae music; and a fall Irish folk festival. Family activities include the country’s largest go-kart street race. Experience a downtown architectural tour and the Broadway Historic District.

Moline is one of the agricultural capitals of the world, home of John Deere and steeped in history. The modern downtown area features great riverfront views and evening entertainment with musicals performed by local actors.

East Moline is home to many great events and festivities. Empire Park is right on the Mississippi River, walk along the riverfront trails of The Quarter or visit to the John Deere Harvester Works, one of the world’s largest combine factories.

The North Shore Communities along Lake Michigan are minutes from Chicago’s city center: Evanston, Glenview, Northbrook, Prospect Heights, Skokie, Wheeling and Winnekta.

South Dakota

Aberdeen South Dakota Before the arrival of European settlers, the area was inhabited by the Sioux Indians. The first group of Euro-American settlers to reach the area in the 1820s was a party of four people, three horses, two mules, fifteen cattle, and two wagons. This group of settlers was later joined by another group the following spring, and eventually more settlers migrated toward this general area. Like many towns of the Midwest, Aberdeen was built around the newly developing railroads. Officially plotted as a town site on January 3, 1881 by the Milwaukee Road which was presided over by Alexander Mitchell, who was born in Scotland, hence the name Aberdeen. The town was officially founded on July 6, 1881, the date of the first arrival of a Milwaukee Railroad train.

The Dacotah Prairie MuseumThe idea for a community museum in Aberdeen dates back almost 70 years. In 1938, John Murphy, a Northern State College professor, and Marc Cleworth, a salesman, created the Northern South Dakota History Museum which was housed on Northern’s campus. The collection of this first museum grew rapidly through loans and donations until by 1941, it had amassed a collection of over 500 items.

Rapid City is centrally located to visit the Black Hills, Mount Rushmore, the Crazy Horse Memorial, Custer State Park and the Badlands. Western and Native American Heritage throughout the city you will find Native American history exhibits, fine arts display, and interactive museums like the Journey Museum that takes you from the formation of the Black Hills over 2.5 billion years-ago to the continuing saga of the Western frontier.

Reduce Transit Times and Travel Cost on Your Next Trip

Travel Plans     Intercity & Local Transport

Cultural Heritage · cultural itineraries · destination management · Historic Towns · Maritime Heritage · Rivers · Transit Calculator · Travel · Travel Plan Fees · waterways

Muscatine Iowa

Pearl of the Mississippi Watermelon Capital Commerce and Industry

Muscatine is situated on a series of bluffs and hills at a west-south bend in the Mississippi River. The river-bend gives the city roughly 260 degrees of riverfront with two creeks flowing into the Mississippi in downtown Muscatine. From the bluffs there is a beautiful view of the town below and of the Mississippi for miles up and down.  Located 25 miles (40 km) from the Quad Cities, 38 miles (61 km) from Iowa City and 68 miles (109 km) from Cedar Rapids, Muscatine is part of a larger community whose residents commute for work.

Muscatine Island is home to working-class neighborhoods and industry

Transport Muscatine is located along two designated routes of Iowa’s Commercial-Industrial Network; Highway 61 serves as a major agricultural-industry route to the south from Burlington to Muscatine, where it becomes a heavy-industrial and major commuter route to the northeast between Muscatine and Davenport; highway 61 serves as a shortcut for traffic from northeastern Missouri and southeastern Iowa to the Quad Cities, Chicago, and points beyond. Iowa 92 provides access to the Avenue of the Saints to the west and western Illinois via the Norbert Beckey Bridge to the east.

History Muscatine began as a trading post.The name may have been derived from the Mascoutin Native American tribe who lived along the Mississippi in the 1700s. From the 1840s to the Civil War, Muscatine had Iowa’s largest black community; fugitive slaves who traveled the Mississippi from the South and free blacks who had migrated from the eastern states.

Mark Twain lived here during the summer of 1855 while working at the Muscatine Journal

Town Slogans include Pearl of the Mississippi and Pearl Button Capital of the World, referring to when pearl button manufacturing by the McKee Button Company was a significant economic contributor and Weber & Sons Button Co was the world’s largest producer of fancy freshwater pearl buttons harvested from the Mississippi River. Muscatine is also known as the Watermelon Capital of the World, reflecting the agricultural and rural nature of the area.

Connect for Your Travel to Muscatine and Iowa

Shared Mobility Calculator     Intercity Travel Costs     US Trip Planner