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Wichita Kansas

a trading post and industrial hub a regional center of culture media and trade

downtown wichitaWichita lies on the Arkansas River in south-central Kansas, 157 mi (253 km) north of Oklahoma City, 181 mi (291 km) southwest of Kansas City, and 439 mi (707 km) east-southeast of Denver. The Arkansas follows a winding course, south-southeast through Wichita, roughly bisecting the city.

A Trading Post on the Chisholm Trail in the 1860s, it became a destination for cattle drives traveling north from Texas to Kansas railroads, earning it the nickname Cowtown.

the exploration place wichitaBusiness opportunities attracted area hunters and traders, and a new settlement was organized as the Wichita Town Company, naming the settlement after the Wichita tribe. In the early 20th century, oil and natural gas deposits were discovered nearby triggering an economic boom in Wichita as producers established refineries, fueling stations, and headquarters in the city. Resources generated by the oil boom enabled local entrepreneurs to invest in airplane manufacturing. Except for a slow period in the 1970s, Wichita has continued to grow steadily into the 21st century as the city government and local organizations began collaborating to re-develop downtown Wichita and older neighborhoods in the city.

wichita former train stationNeighborhoods include Old Town, a 50-acre area home to nightclubs, bars, restaurants, a movie theater, shops, apartments and condominiums, many of which make use of historical warehouse-type spaces. The two most notable residential areas of Wichita are Riverside and College Hill, along with Delano on the west side of the Arkansas River and Midtown in the north-central part of the city.

wichita orpheum theaterThe Arts Wichita is a cultural center for Kansas and home to several art museums and performing arts groups. The Wichita Art Museum is the largest art museum in the state of Kansas with 7,000 works in permanent collections and the Ulrich Museum of Art at Wichita State University is a modern and contemporary art museum with over 6,300 works. Small art galleries are scattered around the city with some clustered in the districts of Old Town, Delano and south Commerce street. The music hub of central Kansas draws major acts from around the world, performing at concert halls, arenas and stadiums around the area.

Wichita Transit operates 53 buses on 18 fixed bus routes within the city providing over 2 million trips per year as well as a demand response paratransit service with 320,800 passenger trips annually. Intercity bus services connect Wichita with other Kansas towns, Oklahoma and Colorado. Wichita’s Bikeways cover 115 miles of which one third were added between 201 and 2018

the keeper of the plains wichita, kansasConnect for Travel to Wichita and Kansas

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Morgantown West Virginia

historic neighborhoods industry river shipping and personal rapid transit

Morgantown is located just south of the Mason-Dixon Line, 75 miles (121 km) south of Pittsburgh, 208 mi (335 km) north-northwest of Washington, D.C., 204 mi (328 km) east of Columbus and 156 miles (251 km) northeast of Charleston, WV.

downtown morgantownThe History of Morgantown is closely tied to the Anglo-French struggle for this territory. Until the Treaty of Paris in 1763, the area was greatly contested by white settlers and Native Americans, and by British and French soldiers. Several forts were built during this time, including Fort Morgan in 1772 when Zackquill Morgan established a homestead near present-day Fayette Street and University Avenue.wharf-districtThe city is comprised of several neighborhoods that were once independent towns, including: First Ward, Woodburn, South Park, Jerome Park, South Hills, Second Ward, Greenmont, Suncrest, Evansdale, Wiles Hill, Sunnyside, Sabraton, the Mileground, and North Hills. While some of these are in part or entirely outside the city limits, they are still considered part of Morgantown as trolley cars determined how far people lived outside of the city.

Development of the DuPont Ordnance Works during World War II resulted in prefabricated homes being constructed in Suncrest, the names of some streets reflected the community’s participation in various service organizations, such as Civitan, Kiwanis, Lions and Rotary.

In 2000, the White House Millennium Council designated Suncrest as a Millennium Community

woodburn circle uwvSouth Park is across Deckers Creek from downtown Morgantown. Originally farmland, it was one of the first suburbs of Morgantown. In the early 20th century, South Park experienced a housing boom, with wealthy and influential citizens settling there. The neighborhood is designated a historic district by the National Register of Historic Places.

Following World War II, many new families came to Woodburn, attracted by the parkland, closeness to downtown, community atmosphere, and nearby school. In 1950, Tom and Anna Torch opened the Richwood Avenue Confectionery, a corner store and lunch counter that served beer in large Weiss goblets from the Morgantown Glassworks. When they sold the operation in 1963 to Mario and Rose Spina, the establishment was nicknamed Mario’s Fishbowl in honor of the goblets.

morgantown personal rapid transitTransportation Morgantown relies heavily on the Monongahela River for shipping coal and other products. The river is fully navigable from its mouth at the Ohio River in Pittsburgh, past Morgantown upstream to Fairmont Morgantown Lock and Dam, located in the southern part of the city.

Transit Morgantown Personal Rapid Transit PRT most of Morgantown is accessible by the Mountain Line Transit Authority bus system. The Morgantown Personal Rapid Transit PRT system covers 8.65 miles (13.9 km) and has five stations.

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Ohio and Upper Mississippi River Towns

Louisville St. Louis Alton Davenport Galena Red Wing St. Paul

Belle of LouisvilleLouisville was founded by George Rogers Clark in 1778 becoming Kentucky’s largest city by 1830. Strategically located at the Falls of the Ohio, Louisville was a major commercial center with river transportation supplemented by the Louisville & Nashville Railroad, chartered in 1850 and operating 1,800 miles by 1920.

A City of Firsts with a Colorful Past

First in the Nation to introduce the secret ballot and adopt zoning and planning measures to control and shape urban growth, the first bridge designed exclusively for motor vehicles to cross the Ohio River, and birthplace of Mary Millicent Miller, the first woman in the United States to receive a steamboat master’s license. Famous citizens include President Zachary Taylor, two U.S. Supreme Court Justices, naturalist John James Audubon and boxing legend Muhammad Ali.

Werne's Row, Old LouisvilleNeighborhoods Louisville’s earliest neighborhoods were incorporated river towns each with its own strong sense of neighborhood identity. The area saw an influx of German and Irish immigrants and, with the advent of streetcars, suburban growth. 1890-1930 streetcars marked the era of the beginning of the city’s suburbs combining rural ambiance with urban amenities.

Downtown St. Louis has undergone a myriad of changes and modifications since its days as a garment and shoe manufacturing center. The Loft District is home to major corporations, small businesses, residential lofts, boutiques, galleries, restaurants and nightspots. The neighborhood’s evolution has returned the once proud historic buildings to service.

laclede landing.jpegThe Gateway Arch soars 630 feet above downtown St. Louis. America’s tallest man-made monument offers a 30-mile panoramic view of the Mississippi River and the city; it was built to honor President Thomas Jefferson and his vision of a continental United States.

The Central West End is over a century old and full of charming sidewalk cafés, galleries, antique shops, restaurants, boutiques and pubs. Adjacent to the commercial district, it is characterized by tree-lined streets, stately turn-of-the-century homes and the family apartment of playwright Tennessee Williams, setting of his play The Glass Menagerie.

Soulard Farmers Market credit Gordon RadfordSoulard is the city’s oldest neighborhood. Its historic streets, lined with red brick townhomes, are located five minutes south of the Arch. It is named for Antoine Soulard, a Frenchman who surveyed colonial St. Louis and is home to historic churches, built by St. Louis’ immigrant communities. Soulard marks its French heritage with an annual Mardi Gras fête; revelers also flock to the neighborhood in the fall for Oktoberfest. The Farmers Market has been operating since 1779.

Grafton RiverfrontAlton is located 25 Miles north of St. Louis amid the confluence of three navigable rivers, the Mississippi, the Illinois and the Missouri, as a river trading and industrial town whose waterfront features concrete grain silos and railroad tracks for the shipping of grains and produce. Once the site of several brick factories, Alton’s streets are paved in brick along with many commercial buildings located downtown. The Great Rivers Region is accessible from six interstates, an international airport and an Amtrak station.

Your River Towns and Neighborhoods Itinerary

The Quad Cities area consists of Davenport and Bettendorf in Iowa, and Moline, East Moline and Rock Island in Illinois. The region has the excitement of a big city and the hospitality of a small town with award-winning museums and cultural centers, internationally-recognized festivals, beautiful riverfronts and a vibrant nightlife.

rock island arsenalDavenport has beautiful riverfront vistas and an active downtown area with the Figge Art and Putnam History Museums and great shopping at the North Park Mall. Bettendorf the Library and adjacent Family Museum provide exciting programs and storytelling. Rock Island is known for its festivals and nightlife with Cajun food and zydeco music. Experience a downtown architectural tour and the Broadway Historic District. Moline is one of the agricultural capitals of the world, home of John Deere. The modern downtown area features great riverfront views and evening entertainment with musicals performed by local actors. East Moline is home to many great events and festivities. Empire Park is right on the Mississippi River, walk along the riverfront trails of The Quarter or visit to the John Deere Harvester Works, one of the world’s largest combine factories.

The Galena Historic District Main Street was among the first to require the architectural review of exterior building modifications. Also, zoning restrictions contributed to the prevalence of brick buildings and efforts to improve the existing infrastructure while preserving the character of this neighborhood. Trolley Cars follow parade routes north and south on Main Street and connect shopping to parks and wineries. Main Street in Galena has specialty shops, restaurants and is home to DeSoto House Hotel which opened in 1855 and is the oldest operating hotel in Illinois.

Main Street GalenaThe Galena Historic District is Listed in the National Register of Historic Places

Environment Because of the city’s proximity to the Galena River, buildings have been threatened on numerous occasions by flooding. In 2011, over a 12-hour period, Galena received nearly 15 inches of rain and he Galena River rose to more than twice its normal height. A dike and floodgates were built to prevent flooding of the city.

The River Towns of southeast Minnesota are located 60 miles from the Twin Cities. Winona is an arts and cultural center with three major galleries that hold works by Picasso, Van Gogh and Monet that depict lakes, oceans and rivers. The Garvin Heights overlook features panoramic views of the town and Mississippi River Valley. Follow the Minnesota River Valley Scenic Byway to New Ulm and experience Old World German heritage through unique architecture, restaurants and shops selling German imports, from chocolates to cuckoo clocks. A traditional Glockenspiel features figures from the town’s history.

Red Wing MNRed Wing was officially incorporated in 1857. Located in the Mississippi River Valley and flanked by rolling bluffs, the town is a leading manufacturer of leather, pottery and Red Wing Shoes. The town is named for the Native American Chief who first met a US Army Officer in 1805. Tucked between bluffs and the river, Red Wing has many historic Victorian properties and farmhouses, including the St James hotel that dates to the 1880s. It overlooks the Mississippi River near the 1904 Amtrak Depot, home to an art gallery and a visitor center.

Minnesota means clear blue water from the Dakota language. Nearly 60 percent of the population lives in the Twin Cities of Minneapolis and Saint Paul, the center of transportation, business, industry, education, government and an internationally renowned arts community. The remainder of the Land of 10,000 Lakes consists of western prairies, forests in the southeast and mining, forestry, and recreation in the North Woods.

St Paul river viewThe Twin Cities besides the Mississippi river, they are also connected by the Metro Green Line light rail, which runs between Minneapolis’ Target Field and St. Paul’s Union Depot, with more than 20 stops.

Performing Arts Minnesota is home to older stages that have been restored. Fergus Falls built in 1921 as the Orpheus, and later known as the Fergus Theatre, this venue has evolved from vaudeville to film and back to stage performances. The Center for the Arts remodeled and updated the space in 1995, showcasing a variety of live performances.

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Discover Takoma Park Maryland

Victorian Architecture B&O Railroad Parks Neighborhoods Education and Diversity

Takoma Park what is now Takoma Park MD and Takoma D.C. began as a late 19th century railroad-stop, in the Victorian suburb known only as Takoma Park. Founded in 1883 and incorporated in 1890, it is a planned commuter suburb located along the Metropolitan Branch of the historic B&O Railroad northeast of Washington, D.C.

Clock tower in Ward Sinclair Plaza Takoma ParkHistory Takoma Park was one of first railroad-accessible suburbs in the D.C. area. At 350 feet in elevation, this new suburb was high enough to avoid the malaria and mosquitoes that plagued the nation’s capital. Until 1997, the City straddled two counties with the eastern portion of Takoma Park located in Prince George’s County and the western portion in Montgomery County.

Preserving Historic Takoma Park among the first suburbs of Washington D.C., Takoma Park is the largest historic district in Montgomery County. The Montgomery County Historic District was established in 1992, with Takoma Park its largest district in the County; it includes several residential and commercial neighborhoods such as Takoma Old Town and Takoma Junction. Takoma DC is also an historic district, making the area one of the only multi-jurisdictional historic districts in the region.

Residential and Commercial property owners in the Montgomery County Takoma Park Historic District require a Historic Area Work Permit prior to undertaking any proposed changes to the exterior of a structure or to the environmental setting of their site.

First American City to Allow Municipal Vote to 16-Year-Old Citizens

Sligo Creek MarylandThe National Register of Historic Places District for Takoma Park was designated in 1976 in Maryland and in the District of Columbia in 1983. Much of the original residential development was included in this district, which embodies a rich variety of American architectural late 19th to early 20th century styles.

Stream Valley Parks along Sligo Creek and Long Branch Creek cross the city and, along with other city parks, provide bike trails and play areas for the community.

Diversity Takoma Park is a community of many different cultures and interests. There is no one racial or ethnic category that represents a majority of the population. Over a quarter of the population was born in another country, mostly from Latin America and Africa. Residents can walk, bike, or take a short Metro or bus ride to many popular destinations.

US Main Streets and Historic Districts Itineraries

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Takoma Park downtownNeighborhoods Takoma Park is largely residential, with a mix of single family homes and small and large apartment buildings. Homes range from historic bungalows and Victorians to modest colonials and ramblers. The largest commercial district is Takoma-Langley Crossroads, centered at the intersection of University Boulevard and New Hampshire Avenue. The Old Takoma business area is a neighborhood commercial district near the Takoma Metro station.

Education the Takoma Park/Silver Spring campus of Montgomery College (a community college) and the campus of Washington Adventist University are in Takoma Park. Besides the excellent Montgomery County public schools, Takoma Park is served by several private parochial schools.

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River Towns on the Ohio and Upper Mississippi

Louisville St. Louis Alton Davenport Galena Red Wing St. Paul

Louisville was founded by George Rogers Clark in 1778 becoming Kentucky’s largest city by 1830. Strategically located at the Falls of the Ohio, Louisville was a major commercial center with river transportation supplemented by the Louisville & Nashville Railroad, chartered in 1850 and operating 1,800 miles by 1920.

A City of Firsts with a Colorful Past

Louisville 4thStreet LiveFirst in the Nation to introduce the secret ballot and adopt zoning and planning measures to control and shape urban growth, the first bridge designed exclusively for motor vehicles to cross the Ohio River, and birthplace of Mary Millicent Miller, the first woman in the United States to receive a steamboat master’s license. Famous citizens include President Zachary Taylor, two U.S. Supreme Court Justices, naturalist John James Audubon and boxing legend Muhammad Ali.

Neighborhoods Louisville’s earliest neighborhoods were incorporated river towns each with its own strong sense of neighborhood identity. The area saw an influx of German and Irish immigrants and, with the advent of streetcars, suburban growth. 1890-1930 streetcars marked the era of the beginning of the city’s suburbs combining rural ambiance with urban amenities.

Fox TheatreDowntown St. Louis has undergone a myriad of changes and modifications since its days as a garment and shoe manufacturing center. The Loft District is home to major corporations, small businesses, residential lofts, boutiques, galleries, restaurants and nightspots. The neighborhood’s evolution has returned the once proud historic buildings to service.

The Gateway Arch soars 630 feet above downtown St. Louis. America’s tallest man-made monument offers a 30-mile panoramic view of the Mississippi River and the city; it was built to honor President Thomas Jefferson and his vision of a continental United States.

The Central West End is over a century old and full of charming sidewalk cafés, galleries, antique shops, restaurants, boutiques and pubs. Adjacent to the commercial district, it is characterized by tree-lined streets, stately turn-of-the-century homes and the family apartment of playwright Tennessee Williams, setting of his play The Glass Menagerie.

Webster Groves is an enclave filled with century-old homes and a mélange of architectural styles with cultural offerings, cozy restaurants, and boutiques. Over 300 of the community’s homes are listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The neighborhood includes the 1857 Hawken House, built by inventors of the rifle that explorers took to the western frontier, Webster University and the Loretto-Hilton Theatre.

Soulard Farmers Market credit Gordon RadfordSoulard is the city’s oldest neighborhood. Its historic streets, lined with red brick townhomes, are located five minutes south of the Arch. It is named for Antoine Soulard, a Frenchman who surveyed colonial St. Louis and is home to historic churches, built by St. Louis’ immigrant communities. Soulard marks its French heritage with an annual Mardi Gras fête; revelers also flock to the neighborhood in the fall for Oktoberfest. The Farmers Market has been operating since 1779.

Laclede’s Landing is where 19th century architecture meets 21st century dining and entertainment. The Landing is a collection of historic riverfront warehouses that have been converted into nightclubs and restaurants.

Alton IL Melvin Price LocksAlton is located 25 Miles north of St. Louis amid the confluence of three navigable rivers, the Mississippi, the Illinois and the Missouri, as a river trading and industrial town whose waterfront features concrete grain silos and railroad tracks for the shipping of grains and produce. Once the site of several brick factories, Alton’s streets are paved in brick along with many commercial buildings located downtown. The Great Rivers Region is accessible from six interstates, an international airport and an Amtrak station.

Historic Trails Alton’s Civil War and Lincoln Legacy Trail features costumed docents at sites throughout the city revealing Alton’s legacy through personal tales along with the Underground Railroad, where runaway slaves were hidden in caves, barns and basements. The Alton Museum of History and Art has special exhibits relating to Alton’s connection to the Civil War era.

The Quad Cities area consists of Davenport and Bettendorf in Iowa, and Moline, East Moline and Rock Island in Illinois. The region has the excitement of a big city and the hospitality of a small town with award-winning museums and cultural centers, internationally-recognized festivals, beautiful riverfronts and a vibrant nightlife.

Quad CityDavenport has beautiful riverfront vistas and an active downtown area with the Figge Art and Putnam History Museums and great shopping at the North Park Mall. Bettendorf the Library and adjacent Family Museum provide exciting programs and storytelling. Rock Island is known for its festivals and nightlife with Cajun food and zydeco music. Experience a downtown architectural tour and the Broadway Historic District. Moline is one of the agricultural capitals of the world, home of John Deere. The modern downtown area features great riverfront views and evening entertainment with musicals performed by local actors. East Moline is home to many great events and festivities. Empire Park is right on the Mississippi River, walk along the riverfront trails of The Quarter or visit to the John Deere Harvester Works, one of the world’s largest combine factories.

The Galena Historic District Main Street was among the first to require the architectural review of exterior building modifications. Also, zoning restrictions contributed to the prevalence of brick buildings and efforts to improve the existing infrastructure while preserving the character of this neighborhood. Trolley Cars follow parade routes north and south on Main Street and connect shopping to parks and wineries. Main Street in Galena has specialty shops, restaurants and is home to DeSoto House Hotel which opened in 1855 and is the oldest operating hotel in Illinois.

The Galena Historic District is Listed in the National Register of Historic Places

Galena Illinois ViewEnvironment Because of the city’s proximity to the Galena River, buildings have been threatened on numerous occasions by flooding. In 2011, over a 12-hour period, Galena received nearly 15 inches of rain and he Galena River rose to more than twice its normal height. A dike and floodgates were built to prevent flooding of the city.

The River Towns of southeast Minnesota are located 60 miles from the Twin Cities. Winona is an arts and cultural center with three major galleries that hold works by Picasso, Van Gogh and Monet that depict lakes, oceans and rivers. The Garvin Heights overlook features panoramic views of the town and Mississippi River Valley. Follow the Minnesota River Valley Scenic Byway to New Ulm and experience Old World German heritage through unique architecture, restaurants and shops selling German imports, from chocolates to cuckoo clocks. A traditional Glockenspiel features figures from the town’s history.

Red Wing Memorial ParkRed Wing was officially incorporated in 1857. Located in the Mississippi River Valley and flanked by rolling bluffs, the town is a leading manufacturer of leather, pottery and Red Wing Shoes. The town is named for the Native American Chief who first met a US Army Officer in 1805. Tucked between bluffs and the river, Red Wing has many historic Victorian properties and farmhouses, including the St James hotel that dates to the 1880s. It overlooks the Mississippi River near the 1904 Amtrak Depot, home to an art gallery and a visitor center.

St Paul river viewMinnesota means clear blue water from the Dakota language. Nearly 60 percent of the population lives in the Twin Cities of Minneapolis and Saint Paul, the center of transportation, business, industry, education, government and an internationally renowned arts community. The remainder of the Land of 10,000 Lakes consists of western prairies, forests in the southeast and mining, forestry, and recreation in the North Woods.

The Twin Cities besides the Mississippi river, they are also connected by the Metro Green Line light rail, which runs between Minneapolis’ Target Field and St. Paul’s Union Depot, with more than 20 stops.

First Avenue nightclubPerforming Arts Minnesota is home to older stages that have been restored. Fergus Falls built in 1921 as the Orpheus, and later known as the Fergus Theatre, this venue has evolved from vaudeville to film and back to stage performances. The Center for the Arts remodeled and updated the space in 1995, showcasing a variety of live performances.

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Cogeneration for Your Commercial Property

Cogeneration involves the recovery of otherwise-wasted thermal energy to produce useful thermal energy or electricity. Off-grid neighborhoods, small towns and businesses can harness a combination of renewable energy, household composting, wastewater management agricultural and industrial waste-to-resource systems to generate surplus energy that enable self-reliant and resilient neighborhoods.

Green City ManhattanCommunities benefit from new, scalable and mobile technologies that are personalized to meet the unique requirements to achieve a closed loop system utilizing available local resources. Biogas can be used in cogeneration systems for production of heat to be used on site and other requirements. This technology can treat waste from agricultural farms, livestock farms and milk factories as well as produce green energy that can be sold.

District Energy Networks utilize any combination of fossil, recuperative and renewable fuels to create energy and heat that is then distributed from a central system via a pipeline system to business, institutional and private users resulting in functional, economic and ecological advantages Video

CHP basic schematicFinancing Alternatives Traditional banking and leasing options are available along with federal, state and local assistance. Also, build, operate and transfer – bot – programs that reduce upfront investment costs.

Energy Management for Small and Medium-sized Commercial Buildings

Load Types there are three major loads in commercial buildings: HVAC, lighting and plug loads. Electricity use by HVAC equipment accounts for 30 percent of total electricity consumption, lighting loads use 38 percent and plug loads 6 percent.

Cost and Interoperability BAS systems need to become much more interoperable, scalable, and easy to deploy by utilizing open architectures, plug-and-play and providing local or remote monitoring. Most systems currently use proprietary architectures requiring building owners and controls designers to purchase devices and controllers from a single vendor instead of optimal products, controls, and services from different vendors.

portfolio-managerA turn-key solution that reduces installation and maintenance costs. In addition, it is a scalable and broadly interoperable solution with seamless HVAC, lighting, plug load equipment and controller integration from different manufacturers, hence plug-and-play functionality for the many system configurations found in smaller commercial architectures.

Benefits the system provides small-sized commercial building owners access to flexible, cost-effective building energy management that streamlines operations and optimizes energy usage. Also, the greater interconnection between building systems and a centralized control structure facilitates demand response, providing additional savings and better integration with the electric power grid.

Efficiency Solutions for Your Property  

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Portland Oregon

Neighborhood Planning & Development Sustainability and Local Transport

Located between the Cascade Mountains and the Pacific Ocean, Portland is at the northern end of the Willamette Valley and river which flows through the city and links with the Columbia River. The citizens and their local government are notable for: land-use planning, local transport, environment conscious policies, high walkability, large numbers of bicyclists and ten thousand acres of public parks.

Neighborhoods the Office of Neighborhood Involvement serves as a conduit between city government and Portland’s 95 neighborhoods, each represented by a volunteer association serving as liaison between residents and the city government. Portland and its surrounding metropolitan area also have the only directly elected metro planning organization the United States with responsibility for land use, transport planning and solid waste management.

Planning & Development land use planning controls, dating as far back as 1903, statewide land conservation policies adopted in 1973 and the 1979 urban growth boundary program have led to urban areas where high-density development and traditional farm land with restrictions on non-agricultural development. Portland’s unique approach to development has prevented neglect of the downtown areas; UGBs and economic development zones have led to the development of a large portion of downtown, numerous mid- and high-rise developments, and an overall increase in housing and business density.

Portland’s climate action plan cuts greenhouse gases to 80% below 1990 levels by 2050

Local Transport Metropolitan Portland’s commuters and visitors have many options to get around in America’s best pedestrian and transit-friendly city. Public transit is comprised of TriMet’s regional bus network and the Metropolitan Area Express – MAX – light rail system, which connects the city and suburbs while the WES Commuter Rail reaches Portland’s western suburbs.

Portland Streetcar connects shopping areas and dense residential districts north and northwest of downtown as well as the east side of the Willamette River. The Portland Transit Mall on Fifth and Sixth avenues limits automobile access in favor or bus and light rail service. Portland’s mainline steam locomotives can be seen pulling excursion trains operated by the Oregon Rail Heritage Foundation.

Eight Percent of Portland’s Commuters – 10 times the national average – Bike to Work

Arts and Culture the Portland Art Museum and its Modern and Contemporary Art Wing is home to the city’s largest art collection and is one of the largest in the country. Several downtown art galleries are present in the Pearl and the Alberta Arts Districts. The Oregon Museum of Science and Industry, located on the east bank of the Willamette River, contains a variety of hands-on exhibits covering the physical sciences, life science, earth science, technology, astronomy, and early childhood education.

Cultural Heritage & Museums, Water Resources & the Environment, Local Food Wine & Breweries, Community Public Transport Initiatives

Food Coffee and Brews Portland is home to 58 breweries and independent microbreweries, supported by locally produced barley, Cascade hops and pure mountain water from the Bull Run Watershed. Portland hosts numerous festivals throughout the year in celebration of beer and brewing, including the Oregon Brewers Festival, the Spring Beer and Wine Festival, the North American Organic Brewers Festival, the Portland International Beer Fest and the Holiday Ale Festival. There is also a lively street food scene with over 600 food carts and trucks, vegetarian-friendly eateries and coffee micro-roasteries and cafes.

The Outdoors the City’s Parks are considered among the best in America; 80% of Portlanders live within a half-mile to a park and sixteen percent of the city area is parkland. Parks and greenspace planning date back to 1903 and in recent years the Portland metropolitan region passed a regional bond measure to acquire 8,100 acres of natural areas for fish, wildlife, and people. Forest Park is the largest wilderness park within city limits in the United States, covering more than 5,000 acres. Mills End is the world’s smallest park with a two-foot-diameter circle and an area of 0.3 m2. Washington Park is home to the Oregon Zoo, the Portland Japanese Garden and the International Rose Test Garden. Tom McCall Waterfront Park runs the entire length of the Willamette’s west bank for the length of downtown.

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