Atlantic Coast · cultural itineraries · destination management · food and wine itineraries · Historic Towns · intercity transit · museums · Transit Calculator · travel plan

City Breaks along the US Gulf and South Atlantic Coast

New Orleans Mobile Savannah Charleston Asheville and Charlotte

streetcarThe original settlement of New Orleans and the oldest neighborhood in the city is Vieux Carre, better known as the French Quarter. Established by the French in 1718, the location continues to be a valuable site for trade to its strategic position along the Mississippi River. The district is a National Historic Landmark and is bordered by popular streets, such as Canal, Decatur and Rampart Streets and Esplanade Avenue. The French Quarter boasts cultural contributions from the French, Spanish, Italians, Africans, Irish and others as demonstrated by the development of New Orleans as a global port.

Downtown MobileMobile Alabama is located at the head of Mobile Bay and the Central Gulf Coast. Mobile was founded by the French in 1702. During its first 100 years, Mobile was a colony of France, Britain and Spain; it became a part of the United States of America in 1813.

Gingerbread House in Savannah

Savannah was founded in 1733 on the Savannah River, it became the colonial capital and later the first state capital of Georgia. Its port was of strategic importance during both the American Revolution and the Civil War.

Pink house charleston

Charleston was founded in 1670, Charleston is defined by its cobblestone streets, horse-drawn carriages and pastel pre-Civil-War-era houses, particularly in the bustling French Quarter and Battery areas. The Battery promenade and Waterfront Park both overlook Charleston Harbor, while Fort Sumter, a Federal stronghold where the first shots of the Civil War rang out, lies across the water.

Charlotte is named in honor of King George III of Britain’s consort. It is a city with 199 neighborhoods and many nicknames, including: the famed Hornet’s Nest derived from the American RevolutionThe QC, Crown Town, Home of NASCAR, Gem of the South, CLT, Bank Town, Char-Town and City of Trees.

Asheville Beer TourAsheville has a fascinating past; experience a walking itinerary that commemorates the city’s most significant cultural, educational, social and architecture stories; a museum without walls. Urban Farm and Mountain Trails Gourmet Cuisine Public Art Music Heritage and a Bohemian Culture.

Reduce Transit Times and Travel Cost on Your Next Trip

Travel Plans     Intercity & Local Transport

America · Cultural Heritage · destination management · food and wine itineraries · Historic Towns · intercity transit · museums · Rivers · travel plan · Wine Trails

Touring the American South

A Journey from the Atlantic to the Gulf Coast up the Mississippi River to Appalachia

The Towns and Villages of Loudoun County, Virginia Historic Small Towns Itineraries and Wine Tours

WineTasting in Loudon CountyHistoric Alexandria Virginia Step back to 18th-century America, walk the cobblestone streets, tour stately mansions and museums, explore the true stories of Civil War Alexandria, take a river cruise or bike to Mount Vernon, sip award-winning locally-crafted beer on the waterfront, and shop in Old Town’s boutiques, vintage shops and trendy art galleries.

A Civil War Experience in Prince William and Manassas

North Carolina

Charlotte is named in honor of King George III of Britain’s consort. It is a city with 199 neighborhoods and many nicknames, including: the famed Hornet’s Nest derived from the American Revolution, The QC, Crown Town, Home of NASCAR, Gem of the South, CLT, Bank Town, Char-Town and City of Trees.

Asheville Beer TourAsheville has a fascinating past; experience a walking itinerary that commemorates the city’s most significant cultural, educational, social and architecture stories; a museum without walls. Urban Farm and Mountain Trails Gourmet Cuisine Public Art Music Heritage and a Bohemian Culture.

Tennessee
Music City Southern Charm History Culture and Haute Cuisine

Nashville has been the subject of many books, movies and songs. But, while music is the lifeblood of this city, you will also find here culture, history, haute cuisine, sports, natural beauty and especially Southern charm.

General JacksonBlues Rock ’n’ Roll BBQ Pork Capital Cotton Row and Graceland

Memphis is a city with a rich and eclectic history. Some of the city’s traditions and milestones include: Graceland, Home of Elvis Presley, the Memphis Zoo, the Indie Memphis Film Festival, Sun Studio, National Civil Rights Museum, Stax Museum of American Soul Music and Beale Street Music Festival.

Mississippi

ClarksdaleSights Sounds and Culinary Traditions of the Mississippi Regions. Delta is a melting pot of cultures – from African to Italian to Asian. Capital-River from a mighty river and antebellum mansions to downtown with restaurants featuring soul food, authentic ethnic dishes and modern culinary delights. Pines barbecue and bakeries, cheese and cheesecakes, the tastes of this region take their influences from their Native American heritage. Hills home to William Faulkner, Tennessee Williams and Southern fiction characters, platters of fried chicken, skillets of cornbread, and delicacies such as pecan pie.

 

Mississippi is a true melting pot of regional, ethnic, national and international cuisine

New Orleans Architecture Creative Culture History and Traditions

streetcarThe original settlement of New Orleans and the oldest neighborhood in the city is Vieux Carre, better known as the French Quarter. Established by the French in 1718, the location continues to be a valuable site for trade due to its strategic position along the Mississippi River. The district is a National Historic Landmark and is bordered by popular streets, such as Canal, Decatur and Rampart Streets and Esplanade Avenue. The French Quarter boasts cultural contributions from the French, Spanish, Italians, Africans, Irish and others – as demonstrated by the development of New Orleans as a global port.

Reduce Travel Times and Costs on Your Next Vacation or Business Trip

Arezza Bot

 

America · destination management · Logistics · Travel

Madisonville Louisiana and the Lake Pontchartrain Basin Maritime Museum

Madisonville is located at on the banks of the Tchefunke River near where the river enters Lake Pontchartrain. Founded by in 1800, as the town of Coquille or Cokie because of the abundance of shells in the area, at the site of the Native American village of Chiconcte. The town was later renamed after President Madison.

Madisonville Monument Sign TchefuncteFrederick (Fritz) Jahncke emigrated from Germany in 1870. After working as a mason, he started a business that built the first sidewalks in New Orleans. Using a rented steam-driven hydraulic suction dredge, his firm was the first to extract sand and shell from the Tchefuncte and other rivers to make concrete used in expanding New Orleans.

Shipbuilding the company started building five wooden ships for the US Navy. Two ships were completed – the SS Bayou Teche and the SS Balabac – before the end of WWI.

The Lake Pontchartrain Causeway links Madisonville with New Orleans

The Story of Mobility in America

Maritime Museums in Historic Towns

Know More About It     Arezza    Knowledge Tourism   travel@arezza.net

Lake Ponchartrain Basin Maritime MuseumLake Pontchartrain Basin Maritime Museum is located on the banks of the scenic Tchefuncte River in Madisonville. The museum brings Louisiana’s maritime history to life through unique interpretive programs, exhibits, and publications. These programs include the time-honored craft of boat building, hands-on field trips, constructing underwater robots, restoration of the Tchefuncte River Lighthouse, and other exciting educational opportunities for people of all ages.

A Historic Journey through Maritime Louisiana

Wooden Boat FestivalThe Wooden Boat Festival, the premier annual event on the Tchefuncte River, features over 100 wooden and classic boats. From canoes to pirogues, from bateaux to steamboats, Louisiana’s unique maritime history and culture has it all. Native Americans, European explorers, and early settlers depended upon Louisiana’s extensive bayous, rivers, and lakes as the pathways of survival, linking the interior with the sea.

The Museum features unique exhibits that illustrate the innovation, creativity, and perseverance of Louisiana’s people, concentrating on the maritime history of the Lake Pontchartrain Basin, the lower Mississippi River Valley, and the Gulf Coast of Louisiana. Lifelike examples of native Louisiana plants and animals can be seen in the museum’s exhibits. Other exhibits:

LPBMM field-tripSecret Weapon! Civil War Submarine, the Pioneer

Canals of New Orleans

Lighthouses of Louisiana

Wood and Water, a Celebration of Louisiana Boatbuilding

The Steamboat Era

Waterways to Railways II

Tchefuncte River LighthouseThe Tchefuncte River Light Station is a symbol of the dynamic maritime history and culture of Louisiana. The original tower was badly damaged during the Civil War and was rebuilt in 1867-1868 on the same foundation using many of the same bricks. The Light Station, its keepers, and their families weathered many hurricanes until 1939 when it was automated by the U.S. Coast Guard. In 1999 the property was transferred to the Town of Madisonville and continues to serve the community as a private aid to navigation and as an icon of Southeast Louisiana.

Connect for Travel to Madisonville and Louisiana

Arezza Bot

America · destination management · Logistics · Travel

The American South and the Gulf Coast

American Travel Hubs and Itineraries

The Southern United States includes the states from Texas and Oklahoma to the Atlantic coast and Kentucky and West Virginia to the Gulf Coast. Plan a journey from the Atlantic to the Gulf Coast via Appalachia and the Mississippi River.

Texas Cities and the Hill Country

Mexic-Arte MuseumAustin, on the eastern edge of Texas Hill Country, is the state capital, the live music capital of the world, a center for film, home to the University of Texas and Formula 1’s Circuit of the Americas raceway. The city’ parks and lakes are popular for hiking, biking, swimming, boating and other outdoor pursuits as well as a ballet, world-class museums and a unique shopping experience.

 

San Antonio MissionsExperience San Antonio’s rich heritage by visiting its 18th century Spanish colonial missions, residential areas dating from the 1860s and the local museums that celebrate the city’s past. The National Historic Park the Mission Trail is a walking, biking or driving experience of the five local missions and the centuries of local history and culture: Mission San Antonio de Valero, commonly known as the Alamo, Mission ConcepciónMission San JoséMission San Juan Capistrano and Mission San Francisco de la Espada. The San Antonio Mission Trail begins at the Alamo and winds southward along a nine-mile stretch of the San Antonio River.

Downtown Dallas Arts DistrictDallas is relatively young city with a colorful past. In 1839, John Neely Bryan, a lawyer from Tennessee with a taste for adventure, wandered into the area and was impressed with what he believed to be the perfect ingredients for a trading post and eventually a town: plenty of raw land, Indians with whom to do business, and the river. The young city’s can-do spirit helped bring the railroads to the area in the 1870s, the Federal Reserve Bank in 1914, Southern Methodist University in 1915, Love Field Airport in 1927, the Texas Centennial Exposition in 1936 and DFW International Airport in 1973.

Cowboys Cowgirls Wineries Public Art Trails and Vintage Railroads

Main Street, Grapevine, TXGrapevine is a small town located between Dallas and Fort Worth and is home of DFW International Airport, the world’s fourth largest, with nonstop service from more than 200 cities, including over 50 international destinations. Main Street in the historic downtown has a public library, recreation center, antique stores, restaurants, bars, theaters, a park, and many specialty shops. Here, you can also bottle your own wine, explore Historic Nash Farm, the Botanical Gardens and Lake Grapevine.

A Downtown Walking Tour the Main Street Historic District includes over 50 buildings and their architectural descriptions as well as stories, events and people who contributed to the town’s development. Founded in 1844, Grapevine is the oldest community in Tarrant County. In 1888, when the Cotton Belt Railroad came to Grapevine, businesses flourished and the wooden buildings on Main Street were replaced with new structures constructed of locally-made brick.

Forth Worth downtownFort Worth was settled in 1849 as an army outpost along the Trinity River as one of eight forts assigned to protect settlers on the advancing frontier. The cattle industry was king for a generation of people working the Fort Worth leg of the historic Chisholm Trail, which ran from the 1860s to the 1870s when the Texas & Pacific Railway arrived. In the years that followed, oil and aviation brought new wealth throughout the region. The post-war years found Fort Worth capitalizing on its strengths as a transport, business and military center. Cultural pursuits included the development of the city’s internationally acclaimed museum district.

Food Brews and Spirits in Fort Worth you can experience cowboy cuisine, trendy farm-to-table, authentic Mexican and bayou fare. Highlights include beef briskets, pork ribs and locally grown, organic artisan cheeses, alongside nicely paired wines. Artisanal distilleries offer straight bourbon, premium blended whiskey and vodka made from black-eyed peas. Also handcrafted beers, some brewed with milk, honey and sugar, accompanied by live music and local food trucks.

Tennessee

General JacksonNashville has been the subject of many books, movies and songs. But, while music is the lifeblood of this city, you will also find here culture, history, haute cuisine, sports, natural beauty and especially Southern charm.

Memphis is a city with a rich and eclectic history. Some of the city’s traditions and milestones include: Graceland, Home of Elvis Presley, the Memphis Zoo, the Indie Memphis Film Festival, Sun Studio, National Civil Rights Museum, Stax Museum of American Soul Music and Beale Street Music Festival.

Experiential Tourism with the Traveler as Protagonist

Experiences designed around multiple interests that ensure unique emotions; the traveler participates alongside local cooks, artists, craftsmen, and expert tour guides in activities:

o   rooted in the territory; it can happen only there, and

o   with uniquely local events, experiments, food and wine tastings

o   specifically modified and tailored to your preferences

memorable unique and unrepeatable!

To Know More About It

Arezza    Knowledge Tourism

Mississippi

MississippiThe Sights Sounds and Culinary Traditions of the Mississippi Regions. Delta is a melting pot of cultures – from African to Italian to Asian. Capital-River from a mighty river and antebellum mansions to downtowns with restaurants featuring soul food, authentic ethnic dishes and modern culinary delights. Pines barbecue and bakeries, cheese and cheesecakes, the tastes of this region take their influences from their Native American heritage. Hills home to William Faulkner, Tennessee Williams and Southern fiction characters, platters of fried chicken, skillets of cornbread, and delicacies such as pecan pie.  Coast golf, gambling, art, architecture and great food.

Mississippi is a true melting pot of regional, ethnic, national and international cuisine

New Orleans

streetcarThe original settlement of New Orleans and the oldest neighborhood in the city is Vieux Carre, better known as the French Quarter. Established by the French in 1718, the location continues to be a valuable site for trade due to its strategic position along the Mississippi River. The district is a National Historic Landmark and is bordered by popular streets, such as Canal, Decatur and Rampart Streets and Esplanade Avenue. The French Quarter boasts cultural contributions from the French, Spanish, Italians, Africans, Irish and others – as demonstrated by the development of New Orleans as a global port.

North Carolina

Asheville Beer TourCharlotte is named in honor of King George III of Britain’s consort. It is a city with 199 neighborhoods and many nicknames, including: the famed Hornet’s Nest derived from the American Revolution, The QC, Crown Town, Home of NASCAR, Gem of the South, CLT, Bank Town, Char-Town and City of Trees.

 

Asheville has a fascinating past; experience a walking itinerary that commemorates the city’s most significant cultural, educational, social and architecture stories; a museum without walls. Urban Farm and Mountain Trails Gourmet Cuisine Public Art Music Heritage and a Bohemian Culture.

Arezza Bot

America · Cultural Heritage · destination management · Historic Towns · Logistics · Maritime Heritage · Mobility · Rivers · Travel

Lower Mississippi Travel by Land and River Cruise

The Lower Mississippi River flows downstream from Cairo, Illinois and the confluence with the Ohio River, for 1600 Kilometers – 1000 miles – to the Gulf of Mexico. It is the most heavily travelled component of this river system. Unlike on the upper rivers, there are no locks and dams on the Lower Mississippi. The river is, however, constrained by levees and dams that control flooding and secure the navigation channel for barge traffic.

Mississippi River leveesNavigation the Corps of Engineers maintains channel depth of 9 feet from St. Louis to Baton Rouge. On the lower Mississippi, from Baton Rouge to the Gulf, the navigation depth is 45 feet, allowing for container ships and cruise ships to dock in New Orleans. lower mississippi river ports of call

Sightseeing Excursions in ports like Natchez and its classic antebellum homes and plantations. Relive the history of the Civil War in Vicksburg and the National Military Park commemorating the campaign, siege, and defense of this city.

Relax on Your Private Balcony and Take in Spectacular Rolling River Views

beale street in the daytimeLower Mississippi River Ports of Call include: New Orleans Memphis  and the Delta

Travel with the People that Live and Work in the Places You Visit

on the Lower Mississippi River

Memphis Nashville Aberdeen Mississippi

Mississippi Delta New Orleans

MississippiExperiential Tourism on the Lower Mississippi River

Reduce Transit Times and Travel Cost on Your Next Trip

Travel Plans     Intercity & Local Transport

Arezza Bot

America · Logistics · Travel

The American South

Knowledge Tourism Itineraries

Experience a journey from the South Atlantic to the Gulf Coast, visit Appalachia and the Mississippi River, enjoy the sights, sounds and the culinary traditions of the Mississippi Regions and southern hospitality in Charlotte, Louisville, Memphis, New Orleans, Savannah and Charleston.  The region is centered around Atlanta which was established in 1837 at the intersection of two railroad lines; rising from the ashes of the Civil War, it became a national center of commerce and international prominence following the Civil Rights movement of the 1960s.

Atlanta is the Primary Rail Highway and Air Transport Hub of the American South

Centennial Olympic Park, site of the 1996 Olympic Games, provides a starting point for exploring Atlanta, and surrounding attractions. Zoo Atlanta exhibits more than 200 species from the African plains and Asian forests, including giant Pandas with their twin cubs, the Giraffe Feeding Terrace and one of North America’s largest captive gorilla populations.

Louisville Memphis Nashville Aberdeen Mississippi

Mississippi Delta New Orleans Mobile Atlanta

Touring the American South The US Gulf and South Atlantic City Breaks

Asheville Charlotte Savannah Charleston

Travel with People that Live and Work in the Places You Visit

 In the American South

To Start Please Advise Number of Persons Traveling, Trip Dates and Locations

http://knowledgetourism.net/american-south

Cultural Heritage · Historic Towns · intercity transit · Logistics · Maritime Heritage · museums · Rivers · travel plan

A New Orleans Travel Experience

Architecture Creative Culture History and Traditions

The original settlement of New Orleans and the oldest neighborhood in the city is Vieux Carre, better known as the French Quarter. Established by the French in 1718, the location continues to be a valuable site for trade due to its strategic position along the Mississippi River. The district is a National Historic Landmark and is bordered by popular streets, such as Canal, Decatur and Rampart Streets and Esplanade Avenue. The French Quarter boasts cultural contributions from the French, Spanish, Italians, Africans, Irish and others – as demonstrated by the development of New Orleans as a global port.

french quarterArchitecture is a dominant feature throughout the neighborhood; balconies adorned with intricate ironwork, courtyards filled with lush greenery and beautiful fountains showcase the French Quarter’s European roots, mostly the handiwork of the Spanish who ruled and rebuilt the city after two large fires in 1788 and 1794. Many buildings have ceramic plaques with the street names during Spanish rule.

New Orleans Homes

Creole Cottage these signature single-story homes with steeply pitched roofs have front porches that practically touch the street; present in the French Quarter.

American Townhouse a narrow brick or stucco three-story structure, asymmetrical windows and an iron balcony on the second or third floor; present in the Central Business and Garden Districts.

Creole Townhouse with shops below and homes above, these buildings are the perfect arrangement for the thriving urban center. Arched windows distinguish Creole from American townhouses.

Houses in New OrleansRaised Center-hall Cottage one-and-a-half-story homes raised slightly above street-level and a porch stretching all the way across the front with columns; present in Garden, Uptown and Carrollton.

Shotgun House easy to spot with long and narrow single-story homes with lacey Victorian embellishment beneath the large front eve; present throughout the city.

Double Gallery House stacked and covered front porches, stately box columns and a front door off to one side; present in the Garden District, Uptown and Esplanade Ridge.

Arts and Culture New Orleans’ Old-World roots have created a strong foundation and long-standing appreciation for the arts. Early residents of the city often traveled back to Europe for musical instruction or training in the visual arts, and operatic performances took place in the city as early as 1796. Today the city has countless galleries, performance spaces and museums.

Museums

jackson squareThe Historic New Orleans Collection located in the French Quarter, this collection is the best introduction to New Orleans history. Four exhibition spaces depict the multicultural stories of the region, from permanent displays on the evolution of Louisiana to rotating art and history exhibits.

The Cabildo the flagship building of The Louisiana State Museum is the site of the Louisiana Purchase. It served as the Louisiana State Supreme Court until 1908 and was the location of the landmark decision in Plessy v. Ferguson in 1892. Today it houses exhibitions on the Purchase and on Louisiana history.

Madame John’s Legacy an excellent example of Louisiana Creole residential design at the end of the 18th century. The architectural complex consists of three buildings: the main house, kitchen with cook quarters and a two-story garconniere. It is part of The Louisiana State Museum.

jazz musiciansThe 1850 House an example of antebellum architecture in New Orleans, it offers a glimpse of middle- and upper-class life during the most prosperous period in New Orleans’ history. The house is a part of the Lower Pontalba Building, which was built by the Baroness Pontalba.

The New Orleans African American Museum of Art, Culture and History located in the historic Faubourg Tremé, one of America’s oldest black neighborhoods, and comprised of 7 historic buildings.

The National World War II Museum features a 4D cinematic experience, interactive exhibits, soaring aircraft, personal histories and more.

Arezza Bot