Conservation · Efficiency · Lakes · Rivers · Sustainable Communities · water quality · waterways

Water Supply Planning

Water Consumption comes from a lake, reservoir, river or a groundwater aquifer via wells. Individually, we consume 80 to 100 gallons per day and the typical household 400/day. A Community Growth Management Plan determines the quantity of water that can be safely withdrawn from all sources under drought conditions; the available supply must then be compared with current demand as well as that with anticipated growth. If demand comes too close to supply, then the plan must recommend actions to offset a shortage.

Excessive Withdrawal Prevention is established with safe and/or sustainable yields of an aquifer’s water balance analysis. First, you calculate the amount of precipitation replenishing the water source during drought periods. Precipitation supplies are then subtracted from freshwater flowing into wetlands, streams and waterways that keep these aquatic resources healthy. Thereafter, all uses are accounted for: irrigation, industrial processing, cooling, hydroelectric and other.  The balance is the amount of water that can be safely and sustainably withdrawn. 

Water Consumption Growth is Limited to the Remaining Amount

Climate Change may have a substantial effect on future water supplies; studies indicate that the combined effect of decline in precipitation, and increased temperatures, may cause a 35 percent reduction in the amount of water entering rivers by the year 2040. 

FAQs does your growth management plan include:

criteria for assessing water supply adequacy

current drought-period water supply and demand

how water supply and demand will change with anticipated growth

actions for resolving water supply deficiencies and the factual basis for the effectiveness of each action

how shortfalls will be resolved with anticipated growth.

A New Plan for Your Area if your current plan is about to expire or rates poorly based on the Quality of Life Growth Management system, we can assist you in carrying out the outlined steps and/or conduct a community workshop and assist you in formulating a planning strategy for your community.

Tell us about Your Water Supply Plan

Business · Conservation · Cultural Heritage · destination management · Efficiency · entrepreneurs · Geography · Historic Towns · intercity transit · Logistics · microtransit · Mobility · museums · Rivers · Sustainable Communities · water quality · waterways

Geography Community and Climate Change

Thesis Increased urbanization and mass migrations over the last century are key to understanding human factors in climate change; these are best understood by a careful reading of history and geography in your community. Regions of the Earth that are successfully addressing environmental problems should assist other communities, regardless of their location, set an example and provide knowledge and expertise.

Geography as defined by Halford Mackinder, bridges the gap between arts and science; it connects history and culture with the environment. Mankind and not nature initiates activities but nature in large measure controls –Fernand Braudel. Those working in harmony with environmental influences will triumph over those who strive against them – WH Parker. Human nature is motivated by fear, self-interest and honor – Thucydides.

wilkes-barre ViewSustainable Communities are created by addressing resource protection climate change air and water quality human health and well-being

My Community the Washington DC, Potomac River and Middle Atlantic Region of the United States is characterized by a highly educated and knowledgeable citizenry that is very sensitive to environmental issues and is engaged locally and regionally.

Key Issues Affecting Climate Change

Chesapeake watershedurbanization, traffic gridlock, population increases, community migrations

agricultural runoffs from rivers and tributaries into

farming in the outlying Chesapeake region and urban area water quality issues have led to bacteria in the waters, resulting in swimming bans in the bay, rivers and the ocean

budget limitations have led to reduced inspection of watersheds, hence less maintenance and increases in storm water failures allowing tens of thousands of pounds of nutrients to enter the waterways

education there is still a disconnect between the scientific community and the public at large; climate issues are still not part of mainstream thinking and daily life even in socially and economically sophisticated communities.  

Local Solutions to Climate Change

Richmond Historic Canal WalkGovernments at all levels are engineering political solutions:

o   an agreement between EPA and Agricultural Organizations to implement pollution reduction programs aimed at restoring the Bay to health by 2025, and

o   local food production and consumption, a plastic bag tax, green roofs, bike and car sharing programs, light rail and other forms of public transport

Real success in mitigating climate change will be achieved when environmentally sound practices are adopted by local populations; in democratic societies, this can be achieved when small businesses and entrepreneurs join government, nonprofit and volunteer groups in this effort.

Issues are taken more seriously when your lively-hood depends on it. Hence, information, education and training lead to sustainable wealth creation.

Global Solutions to Climate Change

self reliant communities images by EffektAt the dawn of the 20th Century only 14 percent of the world’s population lived in cities; by 2025, 75 percent will be in urban settings. There are already 468 cities with over a million in population; 40 of these cities have more than 10 million residents.

These circumstances lead to continued economic, social, security, environment and climate problems. Increasingly there is a devolution from supranational and national to regional and local institutions to tackle these issues.

The more fortunate communities have an obligation to share their know-how, expertise and experience in climate change; it is in their interest to do so.

Tell us about Your Community and Projects

Arezza Bot

 

America · destination management · Logistics · Travel

Coastal Lake and River Travel

Historic Cultural and Culinary Traditions along America’s Waterways

There are many points of interest in the United States; we have selected anchor locations from which you can best base your travel movements, mindful that you are likely to visit three to four places in a compressed time, typically 7 to 10 days, and experience multiple interests that range from cultural to culinary, wellness and the environment.

NewburghThe Hudson Valley extends 150 miles above the tip of Manhattan. Designated as a National Heritage Area, the valley is steeped in history, natural beauty, culture, food and farmers’ markets.

Hudson River Valley Scenic and Historic Walking Tours

Delaware River in Philadelphia

The Delaware rises in two branches and flows 419 miles – 674 Km – into Delaware Bay. Its watershed drains an area of 14,119 square miles – 36,570 km2 – in the five Atlantic Coast States of New York, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware and Maryland.

The Hudson and the Delaware were originally called the North and South Rivers

The Susquehanna River is 464 miles (747 km) long and is the longest river on the US East Coast. With its watershed, it is the 16th-largest river in the United States, and the longest river in the continental United States without commercial boat traffic today. In the Canal Era, navigation improvements were made to enhance the river for barge shipping by water on the Pennsylvania Canal.

Pennsylvania Chocolate Craft Beers and Wineries

The Lower Potomac, Anacostia, Patuxent and Wicomico rivers are among the major waterways in the region, but hundreds of smaller streams, creeks and rivers abound providing numerous opportunities for recreational boating.

susquehanna view

Explore the Anacostia Participate in Watershed Management Training

Mid America The Upper Mississippi is the portion of the river from Lake Itasca, Minnesota to Cairo, Illinois – 2000 km (1250 mi) where it joins the Ohio River. In terms of geology and hydrography, the Upper Mississippi River valley likely originated as an ice-marginal stream during the Nebraskan glaciation.

Alton Illinois Architectural Historic and River Trails

The Missouri is the longest river in North America, rising in the Rocky Mountains and flowing east and south for 2,341 miles – 3,767 km – before connecting with the Mississippi north of St. Louis.

Yellowstone steamboat agroundThe First Westward leg of the Pony Express was a Ferry across the Missouri River

American South The Lower Mississippi River flows downstream from Cairo, Illinois and the confluence with the Ohio River, for 1600 Kilometers – 1000 miles – to the Gulf of Mexico. It is the most heavily travelled component of this river system. Unlike on the upper rivers, there are no locks and dams on the Lower Mississippi. The river is, however, constrained by levees and dams that control flooding and secure the navigation channel for barge traffic.

Missouri River BoatmenThe Best Way to Travel is with the People who Live and Work in the Places you Visit

Reduce Transit Times and Travel Cost on Your Next Trip

Travel Plans   

  Intercity & Local Transport

The Ohio River is formed by the confluence of the Allegheny and Monongahela Rivers in Pittsburgh. From there, it flows northwest before making an abrupt turn to the southwest at the Ohio, West Virginia and Pennsylvania border. The Ohio then follows a roughly west-northwest course until Cincinnati, before bending southwest for the remainder of its journey through the US Midwest and joining the Mississippi at Cairo, Illinois.

Ohio means the Good River in Iroquoian

The Rio Grande rises from south-central Colorado and flows to the Gulf of Mexico, acting as the border between Mexico and the United States; it is the fourth longest river system in North America.

Horseshoe BendThe Rio Grande Flows for much of its Length at High Elevation

US West The Colorado River flows from the Rocky Mountains through the Grand Canyon to the Gulf of California. With dramatic canyons and whitewater rapids, the Colorado is a vital source of water for agricultural and urban areas.

The Imperial Valley is the most Productive Winter Agricultural Region in the United States

The Platte River originates in Nebraska and is a tributary of the Missouri and Mississippi Rivers.

Rio Grande El Paso Upper ValleyThe South Platte is the Principal Source of Water for Eastern Colorado

The American River runs from the Sierra Nevada to the San Joaquin Valley, eventually emptying into San Francisco Bay and the Pacific Ocean.

The Willamette River Valley basin contains two-thirds of Oregon’s population and is one of the most fertile agricultural regions in North America, hence the destination of many 19thcentury pioneers traveling on the Oregon Trail. The river supports 60 fish species, including salmon and trout.

South Platte River kayaking Eleven Mile CanyonThe Columbia is the largest river in the Pacific Northwest; its watershed extends into seven US states and a Canadian province. The river’s heavy flow gives it tremendous potential for the generation of electricity with 14 Hydroelectric Dams.

Arezza Bot

Business · Conservation · destination management · Efficiency · Historic Towns

Water Resources Best Management Practices

Water and Energy Projects are catalysts in generating new employment opportunities and entrepreneurial efforts in communities that are in the forefront of managing watershed and water resources issues in urban and rural settings.

Communities are confronting new and complex challenges to achieve safe and affordable water supplies, collect and treat waste water and storm water, flood protection, rivers and streams for fishing and swimming. There are also challenges with aging infrastructure and the impact of climate change on human health and ecosystems.

Storm Water if rain is not properly managed and flows over impervious surfaces into the nearest storm drain, it can have a detrimental effect on rivers and streams. In an urban environment, storm water is also closely related to safety, flooding, waterway health and drinking water.

bend-old-mill-districtChallenges that Require New Infrastructure Investments and Approaches to Urban Water Resources

Waterways urbanization is responsible for many of the sources that contribute to waterway degradation. Increases in impervious surface area and runoff have negative effects on stream flow. Once the natural physical condition of a waterway is compromised by pollution or excessive runoff, it sets off a chain of degradation: erosion, water temperature changes and habitat loss.

Watershed groups, municipalities, agencies, and conservation groups working together to develop watershed and restoration plans, implement projects and return streams to healthy thriving systems by implementing watershed assessments and planning programs, quality control plans, floodplain protection, land use management and storm water best management practices and more.

autumn featival in south dakotaInfrastructure Requires Continuous Inspection and Maintenance

Conservation the true cost of water in a property should be measured as the water rate + the sewer rate multiplied by the water consumption volume + plus fees and other associated costs. In addition, while the water usage profile varies by building type and use, mechanical systems account for 30 percent of water use in a typical building, with cooling towers nearly 50 percent and outdoor usage another 20-30 percent.

Water Heating Accounts for Eight Percent of Energy Consumption in Commercial Buildings

Sub-meters help identify inefficiencies and malfunctions as leaks account for six percent of water usage and older fixtures consume up to five times more water prompting installation of leak detection systems.

Main Street Historic DistrictsBilling Meters Sub Meters Metrics Outdoors Landscaping O&M Irrigation

The Cost of Water is deceptively low as building owners and tenants pay for water twice – water supplied + water discharged to the sewer. Additional considerations include the cost of energy required to pump and heat water and rate increases over time from energy and water utilities. Cost control solutions and incentives range from fulfilling water requirements for building certifications, conducting water audits, inclusive of leak detection, to incorporating water efficiency into standard operating procedures and procurement policies.

Billing Issues verify your property’s rate class and meter size, read water meters regularly to verify usage – units and scale of readings should match bills and internal log books.

Water Meters Require Limited Maintenance and Annual Calibration

Bills can cover multiple meters with specific water usage for each; match all meters listed with their location and equipment covered. Record usage individually and ask utilities for credit on sewer charges for water lost to evaporation instead of being discharged to sewer, irrigation and cooling towers.

Meter and Sub-meter all sources of water to help identify areas for targeted reductions: city potable, reclaimed water and well water. Most facilities have one or two master meters supplying the whole building; others have one meter for an entire campus with multiple buildings. Sub-meters:

do not have to be on separate utility accounts;

can help identify leaks and equipment inefficiencies or malfunctions.

self reliant communities 3 images by EffektWater Metrics the sum of all sources: Potable Water from public water systems and classified for human consumption. Reclaimed Water wastewater treatment plant effluent purchased from a public water system. Well Water obtained from wells, bore wells, and other groundwater sources. Natural Freshwater sources that are not municipally supplied, including surface water sources such as lakes or streams. Other Sources rainwater or storm water harvested onsite, sump pump water harvesting, gray water, air-cooling condensate, reject water from water purification systems, water reclaimed onsite, or water from other reuse strategies.

Outdoor Water Usage the amount of water used outdoors is dictated by landscape size and design, the need for supplemental irrigation, management of pools and other facilities. Outdoor water use is a primary driver of peak use.

Landscaping a well-designed, healthy, water-efficient landscape includes healthy soils to promote water infiltration and root growth, appropriate grading with gentle slopes, mulching of landscaped beds to keep soils cool and moist, drought-tolerant, native, or climate/regionally appropriate plant species, minimal turf area.

O&M maintain existing plantings and protect your investment in plants, remove weeds so water is available for desired plants, allow turf grass to grow longer to achieve deeper root growth, make shade and apply less water to shaded areas, minimize water used for other purposes, shut off water features whenever possible, recirculate in water features, sweep, don’t water hard surfaces.

Irrigation install rain shutoff devices or sensors, soil moisture-based control technologies and sprinklers. Maintenance check the system for broken or clogged sprinkler heads, move or adjust sprinkler components to avoid watering pavement, install and monitor water sub-meters for irrigation systems, monitor monthly use trends, audit irrigation system every three years.

Water ResourcesInnovative Water Solutions for Your Home Neighborhood and Business

Arezza Bot